8 Best Summer Reads

Whether you're looking for a mystery or a memoir, chick-lit or historical fiction, we have a book for you. Check out our picks for summer's best reads.


the chaperonethe chaperone


For a Fun Romp

The Chaperone
By Laura Moriarty

It's 1922, and "It Girl" Louise Brooks (reimagined at 15) plans to take Manhattan by storm. Her chaperone, Cora, has her own reason for quitting Wichita. Will oil and water mix in the Big Apple?











For Smart Romance

The Hypnotist's Love Story
By Liane Moriarty

As a therapist, Ellen is less freaked out than intrigued to discover that her new boyfriend's ex is a stalker. A fresh spin on grappling with misplaced passion.












To Carry You Away

The Orphanmaster
By Jean Zimmerman

A female trader in 17th-century Dutch New York City joins a British spy in her search for a man - or monster - stealing local children. A thriller, love story, and costume drama in one.
Related: 10 Hair Care Myths Busted











To Grip You

Little Night
By Luanne Rice

Years ago, coming to the aid of her sister got Clare banished from her family. Now Clare's niece steps into the breach, hoping to bring about reconciliation. A classic Rice page-turner.












For Real-Life Drama

Crossing the Borders of Time
By Leslie Maitland

Schindler's List meets Casablanca in this tale of a daughter's epic search for her mother's prewar beau - 50 years later.













For a Page-Turner

The Uninvited Guests
By Sadie Jones

A train wreck sends survivors ringing the doorbell at an English manor. Set in 1912, Jones's latest proves to be more than a comedy of manners.
Related: 8 Surprising Secrets of Successful Marriages











For Rich Romance

The Newlyweds
By Nell Freudenberger

George woos Amina online, then brings her home to wed. Now for the hard part: making a marriage from a romance based on false advertising.












For Self-Reflection

Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake
By Anna Quindlen

A beloved writer's rueful insights into a generation that's "still figuring things out" and still wishing to have it all, even at 60.









More from Good Housekeeping: