Blog Posts by bon appétit magazine

  • Make All Your Pork Chops Look This Good

    Danielle Walsh

    Make All Your Pork Chops Look This Good

    We’ll come out and say it: Cooking pork chops is not an easy task. But we promise—you can definitely cook a tender, juicy chop, says senior food editor Dawn Perry—as long as you avoid these eight common mistakes. Here’s her advice.

    1. Pork is Pork is Pork 
    This is true with all meat and fish, but especially with pork: There is a huge difference in taste between your typical grocery store pork and well-raised, well-fed heritage pork. It’s worth the extra couple bucks.Here’s why.

    2. Boneless is Better 
    Generally, we like our meat and poultry to be bone-in. There are a couple of reasons: First, it slows down the meat’s cooking, so it gives you a little more leeway to get a good, crispy sear on your chop. Second, the bone gives the meat a richer flavor. Yeah, you should keep that bone in there.

    3. A Little Salt, a Little Pepper 
    No. A LOT of salt. A LOT of pepper. As with all meat, you want to season that sucker so much that you can see the salt and pepper on the surface when

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  • In Praise of Rotting Food

    Now more than ever, we fetishize that word—fresh. Fresh market vegetables! Fresh fish! It’s imbued with moral goodness. But as Chef Chang explains, rot is where it’s at.

    BY: DAVID CHANG I PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRISTOPHER TESTANI

    April 2014 issue of GQ

    In Praise of Rotting Food

    I take a seat at one of the finest sushi counters in the world and marvel at the exquisite craft of the chef. He slices an ever-so-slightly concave peel of tuna, smears a dab of wasabi onto the fish, shapes a handful of warm sushi rice in his hand, lays the tuna on top, brushes it with an aged soy sauce, and places the piece of nigiri in front of me. I chew a sliver of pickled ginger to refresh my palate and happily accept the perfectly constructed bite. The chef watches for my reaction before deciding that what I should have next is a cylinder of toasted nori, filled with cured ikura.

    No dining experience is more associated with the concept of freshness than sushi: If the notoriously squeamish American diner is to consider eating raw fish,

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  • This Rice Bowl Is Your New Lunch Go-To

    Rochelle Bilow

    This Rice Bowl Is Your New Lunch Go-To

    If you need a quick, healthy meal that’s ready in a flash, but can’t bring yourself to eat one more chopped salad, take heart: This rice bowl is your new best friend. (We’ve told you about lunch bowls, right?) With fiber-rich brown rice, protein-packed egg, creamy avocado for texture, and raw scallion for some bite and zing, this nutritious meal is anything but boring. Add a drizzle of hot sauce over it all to spice things up, if you like. Make it extra easy on yourself by cooking a big batch of rice in advance, then assembling the bowls throughout the week. It’s a lunch (or dinner!) that takes the guesswork out of simple, flavorful food.

    SEE MORE: Our Readers’ Favorite Bon Appétit Recipes of All Time

    RICE BOWL WITH FRIED EGG AND AVOCADO
    Brown rice—higher in fiber and other nutrients than its white counterpart—is the perfect vehicle for this quick, protein-heavy lunch.

    Ingredients:

    • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
    • 2 cups cooked brown rice
    • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
    • Kosher
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  • The Best Way to Cool Your Mouth Down After Eating Chiles

    Amiel Stanek

    When I heard that Bon Appétit was, once again, devoting a whole week to all things spicy, the first thought that crossed my mind was, “What the hell kind of horrible thing are they going to make me do this time?” This time last year, I sampled a bunch of different foods doused with Sriracha—yogurt with berries, coffee, etc.—to see what they would taste like. Spoiler alert: A bunch of them tasted real bad.

    This year’s Sriracha Week challenge? To test different ways of cooling down one’s mouth after eating something really, really spicy. Goodie.

    So, every afternoon for seven days, I chewed up a fiery Thai bird chile, waited until the burning in my mouth was unbearable, and tried a different method for quelling the flames. It’s been a rough couple of weeks. Here are the results.

    Ice Water: Surprise! This doesn’t work. My mouth felt bad. Thai bird chiles are spicy. I mean, I guess the cold numbed the pain somewhat while it was in my mouth. But as soon as I swallowed, the

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  • We're Seeing It Everywhere: Mushroom Cocktails

    image

    Photo credit: StockFood. Illustration credit: Jennifer Fox. 

    It’s one thing to see a trend in Los Angeles and New York, where savory cocktails have become A ThingBacon-infused bourbon drinks? Yawn. A barbacoa-tequila number? Sure, whatever. There’s even a whole book devoted to this genre. 

    But under that big, trippy umbrella resides a slightly less common treat: the mushroom cocktail. It’s been spied on both coasts, from Boston to San Jose. Now even Dallas—certainly no slouch in the culinary department, but definitely dead-center in the middle of America—is in on the act.

    Mushroom cocktails are on the move, folks, from sea to shining sea. And we’re into it.

    'Shrooms are among the most umami ingredients around, and whether they’re sweet candy caps or gorgeous, buttery chanterelles, they’ve got the potential to add wonderfully nuanced notes to drinks. 

    In Boston, chef and owner Charles Draghi of Erbaluce makes a"Matsutake Flip,” which involves infusing bourbon with matsutakes, then

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  • The Must-Know Trick for Poached Eggs

    Claire Saffitz 

    Ever crack an egg into simmering water only to watch the white spread out and form wispy tentacles? It happened to me until I came across this game-changing fix: Break the egg into a sieve set over a bowl. The watery outer edge of the white will drain through, leaving the thicker white and yolk intact. Then slip the egg directly from the sieve into the water; the white will firm up around the yolk, creating a smooth, compact package.

    SEE MORE: The 15 Most Common Counterfeit Foods—and How to Identify Them

    SEARED SCALLIONS WITH POACHED EGGS

    Ingredients:

    • 2 bunches scallions
    • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
    • 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice
    • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 2 large eggs

    SEE MORE: 22 Recipes Everyone Should Know How to Cook

    Preparation:
    Mince 1 whole scallion, transfer to a bowl, and whisk in 2 Tbsp. oil and lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper and set scallion sauce aside. Put the remaining scallions on a plate. Drizzle with

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  • Inside Alaska's Food Trucks in the Middle of Winter

    Jenna Schnuer

    We at Bon Appétit would never unleash another food truck story on your eyeballs without good reason, but when our freelance contributor Jenna Schnuer told us about the food trucks that stay open all winter in Anchorage, Alaska (where she lives year-round), we had to know more about what she dubbed “some serious badassery.”

    After 20 years working in the fisheries industry, Kathy Robinson got a culinary degree at the University of Alaska Anchorage, then decided it was time to add her Wheel Good Food trucks to Anchorage’s small but feisty food truck scene. Along with serving at events around the city, Robinson now rolls her trucks, the Bombolina and the Sonha, farther afield—from a construction site 28 often-icy miles north of Anchorage to, recently, film sets. One movie shoot took her to “the wilds of Alaska,” where it was 12 to 15 below zero. “Working at 12 below, nothing’s easy,” she says. “It’s just a long cold day.”

    SEE MORE: The Venn Diagram of Food Trucks


    Keep your

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  • What Is a Man Bun? First a Hairdo, Now a Meaty Snack

    Alison Roman

    From Jared Leto at the Golden Globes to our very own Brad Leone in the test kitchen, we’re seeing fashion-forward, top-knot-inspired Man Buns everywhere. Which got us thinking, if we could eat the food equivalent of the Man Bun, what would it taste like? Probably like beer, pretzels and pork, right?*

    So we did the most logical thing we could think of: Braised some fatty pork shoulder in a few cans of beer, then stuffed it into a salty pretzel dough. And just like that, something really, really delicious was born. Perfect for any party or for a lazy weekend snack, this doughy, meaty wonder is beloved by men and irresistible to women. (Also: irresistible to men and beloved by women.) It’s the BA Man Bun.

    *Okay, truth time: The dudes around here at BonApp know this a totally outdated, somewhat annoying stereotype—and that while they certainly enjoy the beer-pork-pretzel trifecta, they’re also quite happy luxuriating in radishes, fermenting their own sauerkraut, and counting

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  • How to Bring Food Back From the Dead

    Danielle Walsh, Bon Appetit

    It’s a small tragedy, that forgotten bunch of once-vibrant parsley. Now it’s wilting and limp, tucked behind the milk in the back of the fridge. Or that loaf of fresh bread you were so proud to pick up from your local bakery—but you didn’t consume it quickly enough before it got rock-hard. Small food deaths occur all the time. Sometimes, however, there are things you can do to resurrect them, giving them one more shot at a delicious life. We chatted with senior food editor Dawn Perry about the foods you can bring back from the dead, and how to perform this wizardry in your own kitchen.

    SEE MORE: 22 Recipes Everyone Should Know How to Cook

    Greens Gone Weak 
    Wilted lettuces, sad herbs, and even wobbly celery can be brought back to life with a quick dip in a cold pool. Fill a large bowl with ice water and drop the produce in. Let sit 5 minutes or so. Drain, dry, and spin dry if appropriate.


    Rice That Ain’t Nice
    Dry, hard, refrigerator rice just needs a

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  • Oscars Swag Bags: A History of Edible Gifts Since 2003

    Once upon a time, in a magical land called California, presenters and performers at the glamorous Academy Awards received gift bags to thank them for their time and talent. From the 1970s through 2006, this munificent Eden persisted. Then the IRS came along and ruined all the fun, declaring these expensive tokens income and thus subject to taxes. In 2007, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences discontinued the gifts. By then, private companies had already swooped into the coveted swag space, distributing goodies to everyone from award-winning actors to unnaturally tan reality stars.  The most elaborate of these offerings have been put together since 2003 by marketing company Distinctive Assets, whose “Everybody Wins” gift bags ensure that nominees who don’t get a golden statue still walk away with armloads of consolation prizes worth thousands (one year over $100,000).

    The swag bags feature an array of beauty and fashion finds (this year’s most extravagant include a

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