Blog Posts by Rally.org

  • How You Can Help Victims in the Philippines Right Now

    This post is part of an ongoing series on Shine presented by Rally.org, the crowdfunding site for social good. Rally explores thousands of user stories to find and share with you their most inspiring examples of people helping people across the country and around the world.

    Transform Relief is raising funds to get food and medicine to families in Eastern Samar.Global relief operations are doing their best to help the victims of Haiyan Typhoon in the Philippines, but still, many communities are suffering. A recent survey from Pew Research Center
    found that so far Americans are giving less to Haiyan relief efforts than they did in the aftermath of earlier high-profile natural disasters.

    Many of us at home want to help, but we're faced with this challenge: how can we give the people of the Philippines the support they need? There is no easy answer to the challenges facing the millions of people who are trying to rebuild their lives. But we believe that fundamentally, giving to starts when you connect with a story.


    Rally.org has created a special collection page (

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  • This post is part of an ongoing series on Shine presented by Rally.org, the crowdfunding site for social good. Rally explores thousands of user stories to find and share with you their most inspiring examples of people helping people across the country and around the world.

    Lisa Miccolis (right) works with former foster youth Michell Belo at the Monkey and the Elephant's pop-up coffee spot in Philadelphia.

    For Lisa Miccolis the path to working with former foster kids in Philadelphia began with safari animals...and coffee.


    Lisa, the founder and president of the non-profit organization and coffee shop the Monkey and the Elephant, got the name from a secret code she started using several years ago, after a trip to South Africa. In October 2008, bringing little more than her clothes and her camera, she visited a friend who had been living in Cape Town and owned a bakery there. Lisa hung out at her friend's bakeshop, chatting with workers and customers and eventually connecting with Homestead Projects for Street Children, a local non-profit that works to get boys off the streets of Cape Town. Homestead

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  • Sharria and Andrew Westphal on their wedding day, July 27.

    This post is part of an ongoing series on Shine presented by Rally.org, the crowdfunding site for social good. Rally explores thousands of user stories to find and share with you their most inspiring examples of people helping people across the country and around the world.

    This past summer was hardly a slow season for Andrew Westphal. In June the 26-year-old finished an 18-month preaching mentorship at the church his family has attended for years. He married his best friend from college at the end of July. Six weeks later he was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor, upending his expectations for his marriage, for graduate school, and for his development as a church leader.

    Andrew began experiencing strange numbness and tingling around his mouth and along the right side of his body in April. By then he was engaged to his best friend of his life, and the two of them were pondering whether to remain close to his hometown of Folsom, Calif., or move to Bowling Green, Ky.,

    Read More »from This Week’s Rally for Good: Seeking a Cure Through Medicine, Love, and Faith
  • This Week's Rally for Good: Why This Mom is Running 100 Miles in 24 Hours

    This post is part of an ongoing series on Shine presented by Rally.org, the crowdfunding site for social good. Rally explores thousands of user stories to find and share with you their most inspiring examples of people helping people across the country and around the world.

    Emily Toia ay home, saying farewell to her old treadmill.Emily Toia is a 36-year-old mom from Arizona. This week she'll attempt to do what few of us have done before: run 100 miles in 24 hours on a treadmill in the middle of San Francisco's busiest neighborhood. And if that weren't enough, she'll do it all for a charity benefitting children's education. This won't be the first time Emily-who goes by the nickname Emz-pulls a treadmill all-nighter for a good cause.

    The person she credits for inspiring her to take on such an unconventional challenge? Her unconventional mother-in-law.

    In 2011 Toia completed her first treadmill race for Sojourner Center in Phoenix, Ariz., one of the country's largest domestic-violence shelters. On Thursday she'll run 100

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  • This Week’s Rally for Good: A Rescued Dog to the Rescue

    This post is part of an ongoing series on Shine presented by Rally.org, the crowdfunding site for social good. Rally explores thousands of user stories to find and share with you their most inspiring examples of people helping people.
    Major the mutt, taking a break from his job as a psychiatric service animal.


    On September 1, 2006, Terrance McGlade's Marine battalion got hit by a roadside bomb in Ramadi, Iraq. He sustained shrapnel wounds and in the years since the attack, he's lived with severe depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a mild traumatic brain injury.

    Never could he have imagined that, after getting his medical discharge in May 2012, he'd end up throwing out a ceremonial first pitch for the Cincinnati Reds and dropping the puck on the Detroit Red Wings' home ice.

    Since last fall McGlade has been able to join in public events big and small with the help of a mutt named Major. Before they met, Major himself was in dire straits: He spent two years in the home of a hoarder without any outdoor activity or human affection, living in

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  • Today marks the first in an ongoing series on Shine! presented by Rally.org, the crowdfunding site for social good. Rally will be exploring thousands of user stories to find and share with you their most inspiring examples of people helping people across the country and around the world.

    Sam Lee, a little boy with a big network of supporters cheering him on. Meet Sam Lee. He's a lot like other two-year-old boys. He loves tall buildings, sharks, safari animals, and dinosaurs. He lives in South Carolina where he rules the living room from his cardboard fort, that is, when he's not watching Curious George cartoons. But before his first birthday, Sam was diagnosed with Ollier disease, a rare skeletal disorder, and in late July, Sam's parents, Mike Lee and Erin Benson, found out that he has a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, a type of large, inoperable brain tumor that affects mostly children.

    Ollier occurs in about one out of every 100,000 people. Patients have benign tumors-essentially overgrown masses of cartilage-in and around their bones that can

    Read More »from This Week’s Rally for Good: How to Give a Little Boy the Best Year of His Life