Blog Posts by The Editors at Sharecare

  • 5 Ways to Spring Clean Your Life

    Spring cleaning isn't just about tidying up your physical space. Our quick tips can help you de-clutter all the spaces of your life and improve your health.


  • America's Top 10 Youngest and Oldest Cities 2014

    Find out where residents have the healthiest and the unhealthiest RealAge.


  • Chocolate: The Secret to Job Happiness?

    Workers who got a happiness boost like chocolate or a funny movie before facing a hard task were more productive.Workers who got a happiness boost like chocolate or a funny movie before facing a hard task were more productive.

    By Susan McMillan

    Can chocolate doled out by your boss make you and your coworkers happier and more productive at work? (Hey, who doesn't want to enjoy their job more?)

    That's the theory that economists at the University of Warwick in Britain wanted to test. They recruited more than 700 participants, then created a series of math problems that participants had to complete. The task was timed at 10 minutes, simulating work under pressure.

    Related: Thanks to Job Stress, is "Desk Rage" the New Road Rage?

    A "Shock" of Happiness
    In order to create what researchers called a "happiness shock," some test subjects watched a stand-up comedy video before taking the test, while others were offered a buffet of chocolate and fruit first. The control group either watched a generic video or was asked to sit and wait for 10 minutes ahead of testing.

    Overall, the groups who got the happiness incentives were 10 to 12 percent more productive solving the problems than the control

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  • 5 Surprising Health Benefits of Beer

    Find out why having an occasional brew can be great for your health.

  • Should You Swear Off Meat?

    A study links high-protein diets to cancer and early death.

    By: Eric Steinmehl

    Maybe you saw the recent headlines that blared scary warnings like, "Eating meat in middle age is AS DEADLY AS SMOKING." The claims were based on a recent study that found that middle-aged people who eat lots of animal protein were more likely to die early than those who ate less meat. A finding like that is enough to turn a carnivore into a carrot-cruncher, but is the concern real?

    First, some background: The study, conducted by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Cell Metabolism, looked at health and diet records of over 6,300 Americans age 50 and older. It found that people between 50 and 65 who got more than 20% of their calories from animal protein were 75% more likely to die during the study's 18 years of follow-up, compared to people who ate low amounts. And they were four times as likely to die of cancer.

    Find out how your diet is affecting your RealAge.

    Among people who ate moderate amounts of animal protein

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  • Top 10 Cities for Nut Lovers

    Click through to find out where people are gobbling up the most nuts.

  • Sugar: How Bad is it for You…Really?

    The average American diet contains enough added sugar to increase the risk of heart-related death by 18%.

    By: Rachael Anderson

    Sugar can kill you. That's the headline popping up all over the Internet following the publication of a recent study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. The study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) looked at the relationship between added sugar consumption and heart disease. And what the researchers found is pretty frightening. The average American diet contains enough added sugar to increase the risk of heart-related death by 18%. What's worse, consuming more than 21% of your calories (that's 420 calories in a 2,000 calorie a day diet) from added sugar more than doubles your risk of death from heart disease. Now, this isn't the first time added sugar has received negative press. Research has shown that too much of the sweet stuff can lead to obesity, type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, cognitive decline and even cancer. So, should you rush to your pantry or fridge and throw out everything that has added sugar?

    Related: Don't

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  • Smoking and Breast Cancer: Another Reason to Kick Butts

    Young women who smoke a pack a day for at least 10 years have a 60% increased risk of developing ER-positive breast cancer, a study says.

    By: Rachael Anderson

    When you look at a list of breast cancer risk factors, one risk you often don't see is smoking. For years, research has suggested a connection between smoking and breast cancer, but the link has been controversial. Now we have another piece of evidence: Smoking appears to increase young women's risk of the most common type of breast cancer, estrogen receptor (ER) positive cancer.

    Take a look at 10 anti-smoking milestones.

    Researchers from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle compared more than 900 women between the ages of 20 and 44 who had been diagnosed with breast cancer to a similar number of cancer-free women. Most of the women in the study (778) had ER positive breast cancer. The remaining women (182) had triple-negative breast cancer, a less common and more aggressive type of breast cancer. The study showed that women who smoked a pack of cigarettes a day for at least 10 years had a 60% higher risk of developing ER positive breast

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  • 5 Best Foods for Heart Health

    Celebrate Wear Red Day and protect your heart with these five red heart-healthy foods.

    By: Beth Carson

    It's not quite Valentine's Day yet, but it is the time of year for flowers, candy and hearts. And we're not just talking about the chocolate variety. February is also American Heart Month, and this Friday, February 7 is the American Heart Association's (AHA) National Wear Red Day, celebrated over the past 10 years to bring continued awareness to what is still the #1 killer of women today -- heart disease.

    Visit our Heart Disease Topic Center

    Once thought to be an "old man's disease," this silent killer is to blame for the deaths of almost 1,100 women a day. That's nearly one per minute, taking the lives of more women than all forms of cancer combined. Heart disease doesn't discriminate based on age or race either, affecting women as early as their 20s and across ethnicities.

    The good news, though, is that cardiovascular disease is preventable. And one of the easiest ways to guard your heart is by loading up on whole, nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables.

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  • This Test Reveals Your Body's True Age -- Are You Older or Younger Than You Think?

    Receive a custom action plan to get healthier and grow younger. Take the RealAge Test.Receive a custom action plan to get healthier and grow younger. Take the RealAge Test.

    By: Hope Cristol

    At Sharecare, we pride ourselves on providing health information you can trust from top experts in their fields. Now, a new landmark study published January 17 in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE confirms that the RealAge® Test, our unique health assessment that measures your body's biological health age as opposed to chronological age, is an accurate measure of how long you'll live.

    Find out the true age of your body! Take the RealAge Test.

    What does that mean in plain English? "Researchers were looking at whether the RealAge Test was able to do what it said it did," explains Sharecare Chief Medical Officer Keith Roach, MD, a co-creator of the RealAge Test. "So if you are 35 years old and your RealAge is 30, do you really have the same risk of death as an average 30-year-old? The study found that you do."

    What's more, the study - conducted by a team at the University of California, San Diego, led by James Fowler, PhD, a professor of medical genetics and political

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