Blog Posts by CNBC

  • A Royal Affair: Scenes from the Queen's Diamond Jubilee

    By Bianca Schlotterbeck, CNBC.com



    Queen Elizabeth II marked her Diamond Jubilee, celebrating 60 years on the throne, with a four-day weekend of events, between Saturday 2 and Tuesday 5 June 2012. On Sunday the 3rd of June the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant, saw more than 1,000 boats traditional and modern escort the Queen and Royal Family aboard a specially decorated royal barge down the River Thames.



    On Monday evening a host of stars performed at The Queen's Diamond Jubilee concert outside Buckingham Palace in London. The event was attended by 12,000 ticket holders, with thousands more spectators lining the length of The Mall. Sir Paul McCartney was the final act on a night that ended when the Queen lit a beacon to mark her 60-year reign. The celebrations drew to a close on Tuesday the 5th of June with a thanksgiving service at St Paul's Cathedral followed by a carriage procession and an RAF flypast.



    The royal family continues to be significant driver of tourism to the United

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  • America’s ‘Nanny State’ Laws

    By Daniel Bukszpan, CNBC.com

    A recent proposal by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg looks to ban the sale of sodas and other sugary drinks over 16 ounces at city food establishments. The proposal has many questioning whether New York has gone too far with so-called 'Nanny State' laws that are thought by some to be overprotective or interfere too much with individual choice.

    "Obesity is a nationwide problem, and all over the United States, public health officials are wringing their hands saying, 'Oh, this is terrible,'" Mayor Bloomberg said in an interview with the New York Times. "New York City is not about wringing your hands; it's about doing something....I think that's what the public wants the mayor to do," he added. However, those in the New York City beverage industry are up in arms about the proposed ban while residents are still trying to understand how Bloomberg's plan could affect their everyday lives.

    Bloomberg is not the only local politician in America to propose laws

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  • Concussion Talk Could Affect Football Participation

    By Darren Rovell, CNBC.com

    ..
    For 12 straight years, football in high schools in America has been so popular that the number of boys playing the sport has been greater than the second and third most played sports, track and field and basketball.

    But with the dangers of concussions being thrust out into the open is a participation decline around the corner?

    Former NFL quarterback Kurt Warner has said it has made it harder to recommend that his young sons play the game. Tom Brady Sr. says he'd still let his son Tom, the New England Patriots quarterback, play the game, but maybe not as young as 7 years old.

    If fewer kids played football, it would be seen at the ground floor with organizations like Pop Warner, the most popular early entry football league that has 285,000 players. Registration for the fall season is currently being done across the country, making it hard to determine if there has been an impact.

    But a Twitter poll I took (with 260 respondents) shows that the constant

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  • The Shortage of Women Billionaires

    By Robert Frank, CNBC.com

    News that Gina Rinehart may be the richest woman in the world highlights one of the oddities of today's wealth: why aren't there more women billionaires?

    The vast majority of women billionaires around the world made their fortune through marriage (and divorce) or inheritance, according to various lists.The vast majority of women billionaires around the world made their fortune through marriage (and divorce) or inheritance, according to various lists. According to Forbes, 104 of the world's 1,226 billionaires are women. That's about 8.5 percent, even though women make up half of the total population.

    The ranks of self-made rich women are even smaller. The vast majority of women billionaires around the world made their fortune through marriage (and divorce) or inheritance, according to various lists.

    In the United States, only about a half-dozen of the richest 400 are self-made women - or slightly more than 1 percent. They include Oprah, Meg Whitman, Lynn Tilton and Sara Blakely, the founder of Spanx. The Gap's Doris Fisher and ABC Supply's Diane Hendricks are also on the list, since they co-founded their companies with their husbands. (Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg may also soon be added to the list.)

    The big question is why so few women reach the

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  • What College Tuition Will Look like in 18 Years

    By Stephanie Landsman, CNBC.com

    Soaring education costs could end up rupturing your nest egg.Soaring education costs could end up rupturing your nest egg. It's not just the nation heading for a fiscal cliff.

    Soaring education costs could end up rupturing your nest egg-and bring your child to the brink of bankruptcy before he even gets his first job.
    Even the top one percent may get a panic attack from the latest projected tuition rates.

    Campus Consultants Founder and President Kal Chany figured out what college will likely cost by 2030 based on inflation rates. He wrote the book "Paying for College Without Going Broke."

    The findings? In 18 years, the average sticker price for a private university could be as much as $130,428 a year (See chart.) The situation isn't much better if you go the public route. Sending your child to a state university could set you back at least $41,228 a year.

    Seuk Kim knows what he's up against. He has three kids under the age of three.

    "I am very concerned. I make a decent living to provide for my family, but we are a one income household," said Kim. "We will likely have

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  • What Flash Sites Are Suggesting About Consumers

    By Stephanie Landsman, CNBC.com

    Flash-sale sites like Gilt.com, RueLaLa.com and BeyondtheRack.com came on the scene when recession-wary consumers were hungry for bargains and still reserved about their spending. The sites took advantage of retailer overstocks to lure shoppers in with high-quality merchandise at rock-bottom prices. But now, consumers and retailers are on more solid footing, but the sites don't appear to be losing their allure.

    "The flash-sale sites are becoming an increasingly important part of Internet retailing," said KeyBanc Capital Markets Retail Analyst Edward Yruma. "The idea of product scarcity gives consumers a real reason to shop. We think flash sites are not only showing that the consumer is still looking for a bargain, but that the recreational element of shopping may be slowly coming back."

    Related story: 10 Best Cities for Shopping

    One sign is the range of merchandise they're selling. It doesn't matter if it's a $2,000 Chloe handbag, an $8 fedora, or an

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  • 10 Ways to Save Money by Spending More

    By Katie Little, CNBC.com

    Here are 10 thrifty ideas for smart ways to spend more without feeling guilty.Here are 10 thrifty ideas for smart ways to spend more without feeling guilty. There is a fine line between miser and smart spender. As your accounts grow in size and decimal places, there are several key purchases that may increase your quality of life - and even save you some cash in the process!

    A range of experts shared advice for items that savvy investors should buy in order to climb the ladder and accumulate wealth while also increasing day-to-day enjoyment.

    Here are 10 thrifty ideas for smart ways to spend more without feeling guilty:

    Hire Some Help

    Time is money. If your hourly income is more than what you would pay for someone else to clean the house, walk the dog or mow the lawn, then hiring some help makes financial sense.
    Jennifer Litwin, an author and consumer reporter, added that grocery delivery can be a big-time saver. Litwin listed "avoiding the new long self-check-out lines; getting fruits and vegetables that are well-wrapped and packed; and shopping from the comfort of your own home and still being able to take

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  • Where Have I Seen that Outfit?

    By Daniel Bukszpan, CNBC.com

    Every so often, a movie or television show depicts a character in an outfit that becomes iconic. It probably isn't the intention of most filmmakers to inspire fashion revolutions with their works, but the makers of "Flashdance" probably didn't mind when America's teenage girls started blowing their entire allowances on legwarmers.



    Not every movie or television show can achieve such a feat on that kind of scale, but many try, with varying degrees of success. What follows is a list of those that made an article of clothing famous, made characters famous for fashion sense, or managed some combination of the two. Read ahead to see which ones made the list.

    Stewart wore a Carolina Herrera wedding dress.Stewart wore a Carolina Herrera wedding dress."The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1"
    Last year, fans of "Twilight" swarmed multiplexes to see "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1," the penultimate installment of the vampire series. The film depicted its star, Kristen Stewart, exchanging wedding vows with her undead suitor, played by Robert

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  • 5 Ways to Stay Healthy when Traveling

    By Karen Elowitt, CNBC.com

    You probably already know that traveling can be hazardous to your health, particularly when it comes to picking up those nasty little respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses that are spread via shared surfaces on planes, hotels and restaurants. (If you don't know this, you're either hopelessly out of touch, or blissfully unaware.)

    Those who travel more than 20 days a month are at higher risk of illness, particularly cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and obesity.Those who travel more than 20 days a month are at higher risk of illness, particularly cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and obesity. But it gets worse: Now there's evidence that it's not just colds and flu that business travelers have to fear.

    A 2011 study out of Columbia University's School of Public Health concluded that those who travel more than 20 days a month are at higher risk of illness, particularly cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and obesity.

    The study suggests that the culprit is most likely the long hours biz travelers spend sitting, coupled with junk food diets, and the stress of life on the road.

    So what can be done to ensure you stay as healthy as possible while traveling ... and beyond? The following time-honored tips will help

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  • Sheryl Sandberg: Facebook's Billion-Dollar Woman

    By Julia Boorstin, CNBC.com

    Sheryl SandbergSheryl Sandberg Sheryl Sandberg is jokingly referred to as the "grown up" at Facebook. As the social network's COO, Sandberg runs its all-important advertising business, business development, and oversees hiring. In her four years at the company she's helped Facebook become profitable, expand internationally, and grow its user base by more than a dozen times over to over 900 million. While her boss, Mark Zuckerberg oversees Facebook's products, the bottom line is that she figures out how they can make money, without alienating users.

    Sandberg's story is a nice complement to Zuckerberg's Harvard dropout tale. She graduated from Harvard, first in her major, economics and also graduated from Harvard Business School. Her undergraduate thesis advisor served as a key mentor and boss. He hired her as a researcher at the World Bank soon after she graduated college, and later, he brought her on as his Chief of Staff at the Treasury, where he would become Treasury Secretary.

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