Blog Posts by bon appétit magazine

  • How to Buy, Store, and Cook Watermelon, in Season in August



    There might be no fruit more refreshing than a cold slice of watermelon. The vibrant colors, the heady sweet aroma, the sheer juiciness--it's almost better than a gulp of actual H2O. But it's not just a tasty poolside snack. Cocktails, salads, pops, soups--even chicken and steak--get a burst of summer with the addition of its bright, electrifying flavor. Heck, you can even pickle its rind and roast its seeds for even more snack action. It's the whole package.



    Read on for tips on buying, storing, and cooking with this big, juicy fruit. And please, for the love of God, don't buy the pre-cut watermelons. Trust us.



    HOW TO BUY: Look for a melon that is heavy for its size and firm, with no soft spots or blemishes. Thump it on the side; the sound should be resonant and hollow, not dull.


    HOW TO STORE: Store whole watermelons in a cool place for up to 2 weeks; cut watermelon should be tightly wrapped, stored in the refrigerator, and eaten within 2 days.



    More from Bon Appétit:


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  • An Easy Grilled Steak Dinner in Under 30 Minutes

    Doreen St. Felix


    Grilled Steak and Radishes with Black Pepper Butter Grilled Steak and Radishes with Black Pepper Butter Hallelujah, the weekend is in sight, and you need a no-brainer dinner tonight. Quick Main Thursday has you covered.

    Yeah, we know--30 Days of Grilling has been over for a while. But our obsession with the fine art of charring, smoking, and grilling juicy meats and crunchy vegetables lives in perpetuity. It's summer--we can't help it. Even on weeknights.

    See more: 25 Quick and Easy School Lunches to Pack for Your Kids

    Take this grilled steak and radish dish, for example. It's no frills, all flavor. The piece de resistance is a pepper-flecked butter, which melts into a sauce for your simply seasoned hanger (or flank, or skirt) steak--and accompanying radishes--to bathe in, while a sprinkling of lemon and flaky sea salt brightens everything up. Fire up your BBQ, and in less than 30 minutes, you'll have a fire-kissed steak dinner with all the accoutrements. Did we mention we love grilling?

    Grilled Steak and Radishes with Black Pepper Butter

    Ingredients:

    - 1 tablespoonRead More »from An Easy Grilled Steak Dinner in Under 30 Minutes
  • How to Buy and Store Tomatoes, in Season in August

    Danielle Walsh


    Sliced Tomato SaladSliced Tomato SaladSummertime, and the growing is easy. This week, we'll be taking you through the seasonal ingredients you should be cooking with in August. Today: tomatoes.

    August: the climax of summer produce. We've still got zucchini and stone fruit, but August sees a mess of corn, berries, melons, lettuces of all kinds. Now is the time for veg- and fruit-forward cooking. And we'll start with the humble--no, not humble: AWESOME--tomato. Grab them while you can, douse them in olive oil and sea salt (or slather them in mayo and throw them on toast), and sink your teeth into this refreshing, ephemeral fruit.

    See more: 10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren't

    HOW TO BUY
    Cherry and Grape Tomatoes:
    Because of the many varieties sold, color isn't always an indicator of ripeness. Pick firm tomatoes that are free of bruises and cracks. Ideally, they'll exude a fresh tomato aroma.

    Beefsteak, Plum, and Heirloom:
    Look for intense color (again, they come in many colors) and firm

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  • How to Fillet and Serve Whole Fish

    Dawn Perry


    A whole grilled fish looks (and tastes) impressive--assuming you can neatly dispatch it into fillets. Follow these steps, and pretty soon you'll be showing off at the table.

    See more:
    10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren't

    1. Using a thin-bladed knife and starting just behind the head, cut along the backbone toward the tail. With your hand or a spatula, gently lift the top fillet away from the spine.

    See more: 25 Ways to Use Sriracha


    2. Starting from the tail, slowly lift the spine, using the knife as needed to separate it from the bottom fillet. Discard head, tail, and spine.

    3. Use knife to cut away any remaining rib bones from bottom fillet, and serve.

    More from Bon Appétit:
    25 Quick and Easy School Lunches to Pack for Your Kids
    Make Your Own Cronuts at Home!
    The Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookie
    7 Most Common French Toast Mistakes


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  • 10 Countries that Are Cutting Back on Their Iconic Foods

    Sam Dean




    Last week, the shocking news broke that French people are eating less bread than ever before. The situation is so dire that the Observatoire du Pain, the bakers' and millers' lobby, recently started a "Got Milk?"-style ad campaign, with signs asking, "Coucou, tu as pris le pain?" ("Oh hey, did you pick up the bread?")



    One of the Observatoire's leaders told the New York Times that the regrettable baguette situation comes from changing eating habits, with citizens of la Republique skipping more meals and coming home from work too late to make it to the bakery on time. But as the world economy changes, and national cuisines evolve with the times, France isn't the only nation that's forsaking its most essential food. Koreans are eating less rice, Argentinians, less beef, and even the Russians are slowing down on vodka. Check out the slideshow to see what other countries are leaving their historical staples behind.


    --Additional reporting by Doreen St. Felix and Lucy Nieboer

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  • Break the Beach Bod Diet with This Delicious Chocolate Cake

    Danielle Walsh


    Momofuku Milk Bar's Decadent S'Mores-Like Chocolate CakeMomofuku Milk Bar's Decadent S'Mores-Like Chocolate CakeAfter a summer of quinoa salads, juices, and so much salmon, it's time to indulge a little (beach bod season is waning, right?) Don't get us wrong: we love all those healthy things. But they just don't compare to a rich dessert. And we've got a craving.

    We're turning to the queen of sweets, Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar, for this one. Known for her lofty cakes and decadent ingredients, one of Tosi's confections is just the thing to break a summer diet. We're going with the Chocolate-Malt cake: brownie-like layers piled high with chocolate-malt crumbs, malt-fudge sauce, and charred marshmallows. Sounds a little like s'mores, and s'mores are summer food--so we're not technically straying from the summer diet, right? Right.

    See more: 25 Quick and Easy School Lunches to Pack for Your Kids

    CHOCOLATE-MALT CAKE

    10 servings
    Prep: 1 hour 30 minutes
    Total: 20 hours (includes baking, cooling, and chilling time)

    INGREDIENTS
    Chocolate-Malt Crumbs:
    - 2/3 cup

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  • The 5 Best Pints of Ice Cream You Need for the Ultimate Sundea Party



    As always, better ingredients mean better results. These great flavors are only a trip to the supermarket (or an overnight delivery) away.



    More from Bon Appétit:


    25 Ways to Use Sriracha


    7 Most Common French Toast Mistakes


    The Best-Ever Homemade Fries


    25 Quick and Easy School Lunches to Pack for Your Kids



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  • How to Make Pan-Fried Tofu the Kids Will Actually Like

    Manny Howard


    Pan-fried tofu your kids will actually likePan-fried tofu your kids will actually likeWelcome to The Breadwinner, in which Manny Howard--a lifelong Brooklynite following his wife's high-powered job to Los Angeles--attempts to feed his family, whether they like it or not.

    Lunch is not my meal. I don't eat breakfast until I'm hungry, and that's not until after 10 a.m., and the meal is typically leftovers from dinner the night before. My wife, Lisa, says my relationship with leftovers is very European, as I refuse to refrigerate cooked food. I leave the scraps on a plate under a dish towel (a clean one) on the kitchen counter. She finds this repulsive and quite possibly dangerous, so requires that all trace of any leavings be gone--one way or another--by the next evening. As far as I'm concerned, room-temperature pot roast is a much better meal than a cinnamon bun or a bowl of Honey Nut Cheerios, and if the chicken is a little the worse for wear, a glug or two of hot sauce finishes the work that the coffee started. I'm the only soul in the house with any

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  • The 4 Best Gins for Different Types of Cocktails

    Sue Li


    After pouring a perfect G&T--or two--you might fall back in love with gin. But don't be faithful to the first one you try: Gin varies by type and the kinds of botanicals it was distilled with. We asked Danny Shapiro from Chicago's Scofflaw to sum up the most popular styles and the best ways to enjoy them.

    LONDON DRY
    Tastes of pepper and pine, with a citrusy finish. Nice in a classic Gin and Tonic. Try: Tanqueray, $22

    GENEVER
    Malty, buttery, and heavy on the juniper, this Dutch spirit is the grandfather of gins. Mix it in a gin-based Old-Fashioned. Try: Bols Genever, $35

    NEW WESTERN
    These small-batch gins are distilled with distinctive ingredients. Hendrick's is ideal in cucumber Martinis. Try: Hendrick's, $35

    OLD TOM
    On the sweeter side, with strong anise notes. Use it in a Tom Collins. Try: Hayman's Old Tom Gin, $25
    More from Bon Appétit:
    25 Ways to Use Sriracha
    7 Most Common French Toast Mistakes
    The Best-Ever Homemade Fries


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  • How to Make Cronuts at Home

    Sam Dean


    DIY Cronuts, ya'llDIY Cronuts, ya'llPeople do scary, borderline illegal things with food. And when we find these outlaw recipes, we'll post them in our series, Kookery.

    Cronut fever has been building for a couple of months now, and has gripped the globe to such an extent that even Dunkin Donuts in Korea is selling "New York Pie Donuts," and Seoulites are, of course, lining up around the block. Within weeks of its introduction earlier this year, chefs around the world were getting cronuts air-mailed to their bakeries to imitate, but because of the advance dough-fu necessary to get the perfect cronutty texture, making them at home remains firmly in the realm of Kookery.

    See more: The Ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookie

    The fact that this recipe comes from SushiBytes, a food blog based in the Philippines, just adds to the Kooky layers. And it's layers that make the cronut what it is--layers of butter folded between layers of puff pastry, topped with a layer of frosting (flavored with calamansi, a Southeast Asian orange, in

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