Blog Posts by bon appétit magazine

  • A Crafty Way to Make Your Appetizers More Appetizing

    By Diane Chang, Bon Appétit



    The versatility of origami crafts is often overlooked, and that is a CRIME. Learn how to fold paper meticulously and you can transform simple sheets of the stuff into animal sculptures, tiny gift boxes, and now, tabletop décor. Allow us to show you how to make mini origami star sculptures for the tips of appetizer toothpicks.



    What, you don't think this will come in handy one day? Trust.




    What you'll need:


    Origami star paper


    A pin or needle


    Toothpicks



    Click through the slideshow for step-by-step instructions.




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    10 Kitchen Upgrades for Under $50


    Junk Food Makeover: Tater Tots


    10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren't


    10 Quick and Easy School-Night Dinners

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  • 5 Tips for Dining Out with Kids

    Image by Bon AppetitImage by Bon AppetitBy Andrew Knowlton, Bon Appétit

    Dear BA Foodist, My wife and I like to try new restaurants, but we're also new parents. I've seen what can happen when children behave badly while dining out, and we dread fellow patrons' death stares. Any tips? -Chuck La Vallee, Los Angeles

    Dear Chuck,
    Cookbook author and food god Craig Claiborne opined, "I cannot estimate how many meals are spoiled by fractious, overtired children aching to be home, and their parents are doing no one a favor by permitting such disruptive behavior." I'd guess most folks agree with Mr. Claiborne, judging by the stink eye many waiters and fellow diners show parents eating with kids. It's a shame, really. True, a restaurant is not a playground, but it's not a church either. Some parents won't go near a restaurant with their children in tow, for fear of being ostracized. It's not like this in many other countries, where kids are welcomed to the table and where, not by accident, the food culture is strong.

    A few tips:

    Read More »from 5 Tips for Dining Out with Kids
  • 4 Simple Syrups to Improve Any Cocktail

    By Mary-Frances Heck, Bon Appetit

    Simple syrup is the easiest way to sweeten summer drinks, but it can also add an extra layer of flavor when infused with herbs or other aromatics. They need to be heated in order for the infusion to occur, but then just let them cool and chill. Simple.

    The Base: Bring equal parts sugar and water to a simmer; stir until sugar dissolves. To make honey syrup, replace sugar with an equal amount of honey. Syrups can be made up to six months ahead and stored in the refrigerator.

    The Infusion: Once the sugar is fully dissolved, add spices, herbs, or fruit (see our favorite above) and let steep, uncovered, until the flavor is infused. Strain, if desired, and transfer to a sealed container.

    Read More: 10 Kitchen Upgrades for Under $50


    Photo by Zach DeSartPhoto by Zach DeSart



















    A cup of raspberries or strawberries gives a fruity kick.


    Photo by Zach DeSartPhoto by Zach DeSart



















    Pump up fresh Daiquiris with lemon-zest syrup.

    Read More: The Best Store-Bought Ice Cream


    Photo by Zach DeSartPhoto by Zach DeSart



















    Mint syrup makes for easy Mojitos and Juleps.


    Photo by Zach DeSartPhoto by Zach DeSart



















    Cinnamon works well in

    Read More »from 4 Simple Syrups to Improve Any Cocktail
  • 14 Super Smart Camping Food Tips

    Photo courtesy of CN Digital StudioPhoto courtesy of CN Digital StudioBy Nick Fauchald, Bon Appetit

    We'll admit it: We'd pretty much stopped camping because we couldn't stand another handful of trail mix or envelope of freeze-dried "Beef Burgundy." Then we discovered the genius of Cooler Corn, and figured that maybe, just maybe, there was a way to eat and drink well in the woods. Turns out, there is. Here are 10 tricks to stay well-fed (and even a teeny bit tipsy) on the trail, courtesy of BA Special Camping Correspondent Nick Fauchald.

    1. ICE IT
    For car-camping and one-night backpacking trips, freeze small containers of chili, soup, pesto or pasta sauce and pack them in a cooler or insulated bag. They'll keep other fresh ingredients and drinks cool (no need for ice), and you can thaw them out in your camp stove when needed.

    2. SKIP THE SPAGHETTI
    Pasta can take forever to cook in a camp stove and wastes the water you've packed in. Instead, use quick-cooking alternatives like couscous, orzo or quinoa. Polenta is especially versatile: Leftover cooked

    Read More »from 14 Super Smart Camping Food Tips
  • 9 Surprising Ways to Use a Panini Maker

    By Bon Appetit



    A panini press doesn't hide what it is. In fact, its capabilities are listed right in its name: it's a press. For paninis. Really, though, it's much more than that--if only we could just see its full potential. Below, find eight outside-of-the-sandwich things to do with a panini machine (and one bonus panini for good measure...but it's got chocolate and bananas in it).



    And hey, while we're on the topic, don't mind us if we do a little shilling: As part of our HSN line of cookware, we've made--yes, we made it! (kinda)--a digital panini machine. The fixed plates allow quick preheat time and even heat distribution (they're nonstick, too) and the hinge is designed to adjust to variable sizes of panini. Or burger. Or slab of salmon. And today, you can get it for $60 instead of the normal price $80. So why don't you have two already?



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    Kitchen Upgrades Under $50


    10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren't


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  • Tomato-Feta Open-Face Sandwich

    Photo by Zach DeSartPhoto by Zach DeSartBy Nina Wolpow, Bon Appetit

    Here's a sandwich for the nosy kids out there. We're looking at you, girl who reads the last page of a new book. And you, boy who can't hold out 'til Christmas morning. This is a sandwich with no secrets, because we put the contents right on top--tomato, feta, and all.

    Tomato-Feta Open-Face Sandwich
    Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen Makes 1

    Read More: 10 Kitchen Upgrades for Under $50



    Preparation
    Lightly toast thick slices of white bread (a Pullman loaf is ideal), then drizzle with olive oil. Add tomato slices, salt and freshly ground black pepper, slabs of feta, fresh oregano, and more oil.


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    10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren't

    10 Quick and Easy School-Night Dinners
    25 One-Bite Appetizers
    Junk Food Makeover: Healthier Chicken Nuggets

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  • Rosemary Swordfish Skewers with Sweet Pepper Salad

    Photo by Romulo YanesPhoto by Romulo YanesKiera Wright-Ruiz, Bon Appetit

    You're tired. You don't want to stand in a hot kitchen. You're also hungry. You want dinner. Now.

    We understand, and we have a solution in this 30-minute meal. Dinner? Check. Hassle? Nope.




    Read More: The Best Store-Bought Ice Cream

    Rosemary Swordfish Skewers with Sweet Pepper Salad
    4 servings
    active: 30 minutes
    total: 30 minutes

    Ingredients
    7 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 4 small assorted sweet peppers, 2 sliced into 1/4" rounds, 2 cut into strips
    1/2 small onion, cut in half lengthwise, thinly sliced, soaked in ice water
    1 jalapeño, seeded, thinly sliced
    2 tablespoons Sherry vinegar
    4 ounces arugula (about 8 cups loosely packed)
    Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
    1 pound 1"-thick swordfish steaks, trimmed, cut into 1" cubes
    1 tablespoon (generous) minced fresh rosemary
    1 lemon, quartered

    Special Equipment:
    4 bamboo skewers (soaked in water for 1 hour before using) or 4 metal skewers

    Read More: The Top

    Read More »from Rosemary Swordfish Skewers with Sweet Pepper Salad
  • Foolproof Blueberry Cobbler

    Photo by Romulo YanesPhoto by Romulo YanesBy Nina Wolpow, Bon Appetit

    Baking can get a bad rap. There's all that measuring, mixing, and molding, not to mention the mess--and mess-ups.

    Enter this foolproof cobbler, which entreats you to tear up your dough and simply drop it over blueberries. 'Cause when the going gets tough, gravity helps.




    Blueberry-Drop Biscuit Cobbler
    Recipe by Soa Davies
    6-8 servings
    active: 15 minutes
    total: 2 hours (includes baking and cooling time)

    Read More: The Top 20 Best Tasting Burger Recipes

    Ingredients
    1 1/2 cups plus 3 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
    3 tablespoons plus 1 cup sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2" pieces
    1/2 cup plus 1 Tbsp. crème fraîche or sour cream
    6 cups fresh blueberries (about 2 lb.)
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest

    Preparation
    Preheat oven to 375°. Whisk 1 1/2 cups flour, 3 Tbsp. sugar, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Add butter; using

    Read More »from Foolproof Blueberry Cobbler
  • What's Really in Your Cone?

    Photo by Zach DeSartPhoto by Zach DeSartBy Mary-Frances Heck, Bon Appétit

    Have you ever wondered what the difference is between all of summer's scoopable delights? It's time to get to know what's in your cone. Here's the scoop, from left to right.


    Read More: The Best Store-Bought Ice Cream

    Sorbet and Granita
    These cool, dairy-free treats refresh the palate. They can be made from fruit and vegetable purées, juices, wine, or infusions like tea.

    Sherbet and Ice Milk
    Lighter than ice cream, these contain less dairy but still have a creamy texture. Lower fat content means brighter flavors.

    Read More: The Top 20 Best Tasting Burger Recipes

    Ice Cream
    Often starts out as an egg-based custard. It's the creamiest of all frozen desserts, containing at least 10% milk fat by law in the U.S.

    And now you know.

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    10 Snacks You Thought Were Healthy But Really Aren't
    10 Quick and Easy School-Night Dinners
    25 One-Bite Appetizers
    Junk Food Makeover: Healthier Chicken Nuggets

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  • Meatless Dinners: Summer Squash and Red Quinoa with Walnuts

    Photo by Romulo YanesPhoto by Romulo YanesRecipe by Soa Davies, Bon Appétit

    For this pretty side or meatless main salad, use medium and small squash for the best flavor. Quinoa and walnuts (or a grain and nut of your choosing) add heft.

    Summer Squash and Red Quinoa Salad with Walnuts
    4-6 servings
    active: 20 minutes total: 35 minutes



    Read More:
    The Best Store-Bought Ice Cream

    Ingredients
    1/2 cup red or other quinoa, rinsed in a fine-mesh sieve, drained
    2 teaspoons kosher salt plus more for seasoning
    1 pound assorted summer squash
    2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan plus 1/4 cup shaved with a peeler
    1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    1 tablespoon
    Sherry vinegar
    6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Freshly ground black pepper
    1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves
    1/2 cup walnuts, toasted
    1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, torn

    Preparation
    Bring quinoa and 4 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Season with salt, cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until quinoa is tender but not

    Read More »from Meatless Dinners: Summer Squash and Red Quinoa with Walnuts

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