Blog Posts by Health.com

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  • Bike your way to a better body

    CorbisCorbisBy Rozalynn S. Frazier

    You know two-wheeling it is a great way to shape up (and torch 500-plus calories per hour), but did you know that you can always get more out of your ride? Take these cues from Olympic gold medalist Kristin Armstrong (nope, no relation to Lance).

    Get in tune
    If your bike's been on hiatus for more than six months, take it for a tune-up (basic ones cost about $50). Pros will check everything from the wheels to the steering system, and they'll clean it up for a smooth ride.

    Health.com: Cycling for a cure: 10 bike races for a good cause

    Stay ultra-safe
    We know you always follow traffic rules (right?), but be sure to watch out for cars, too. To avoid a suddenly opened door, give parked ones a wide berth, Armstrong advises. And don't forget your cell phone, ID, and a helmet-one that fits snugly and covers the forehead.

    Health.com: Gear up for your next bike ride

    Tweak your technique
    Rev up your speed and power by perfecting your pedaling. If you're biking with

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  • What’s hot about chili powder?

    By Leslie Barrie

    This spicy seasoning can rev up your metabolism, ease indigestion, and even fend off garden pests. How cool is that?

    Pick the right powder
    The "chili powder" sold at your local grocery store is often a blend that contains other ingredients like cumin, garlic, and oregano.

    To pack your food with the healthiest punch, pick up pure varieties like cayenne or ancho that aren't diluted with other spices, advises Marissa Lippert, RD, owner of Nourish Nutrition Counseling.

    Health.com: A beginner's guide to herbs and spices

    Body slimmer
    Spice up your summer meals and slim down with a little help from chili powder. Studies show that compounds in this seasoning can actually boost your metabolism.

    For a zippy dessert, sprinkle a little of the hot stuff on a slice of cantaloupe, recommends Frances Largeman-Roth, RD, Health's Senior Food and Nutrition Editor.

    Health.com: Best superfoods for weight loss

    Foot reviver
    Been on your dogs all day? Chili powder can help ease the

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  • Healthy cooking on the cheap: Lightened-up comfort food with a vegetarian spin

    Credit: Jenna WeberCredit: Jenna WeberGrocery lists and easy weeknight recipes from a culinary pro
    By Jenna Weber

    This menu features three classic comfort foods, all with a lightened-up, vegetarian spin! Instead of your usual pepperoni, top pizza with tasty, fresh goat-cheese crumbles and mushroom slices (you won't even miss the meat!). The soft vegetable tacos are a wonderful way to sneak more veggies into a picky eater's diet. Finally, enjoy a night off with breakfast for dinner. These skillet-baked eggs come together in only about 10 minutes, and all you need to complete the meal is a crusty loaf of bread and a simple green salad. Enjoy!

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  • Anna Paquin's all-day energy secrets

    The True Blood star opens up about her tough workouts, super-close marriage to co-star Stephen Moyer, and top fitness motivator ("being naked at work!"). By Amy Spencer

    You could envy Anna Paquin a lot of things. Starting with her rocking body, which is on full display one hot morning when the 28-year-old Academy Award-winning actress shows up for our chat at a cafe in Venice, California, absolutely killing it in cutoff jeans shorts and a paper-thin white T-shirt. Then there's her red-hot career-her fourth season playing telepathic waitress Sookie on the HBO hit True Blood debuts this month. And what about her recent marriage to hunky co-star Stephen Moyer?

    But after our day with Anna, we long most for her amazing energy. This is a girl who likes her workouts hard, her coffee "giant," and admits that she doesn't like to sit still. After Stephen drops her off and takes their two dogs to the park, Anna dishes about everything from the pressure to stay thin in Hollywood to whether she

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  • 9 habits of healthy families

    Getty ImagesGetty ImagesEvery wonder how families stay healthy, fit and thin? We asked Oprah's go-to doctor, Mehmet C. Oz, MD-who gets his own show this month-for his tips on how to build a healthy family strategy. Dr. Oz says families (like the Carroll's pictured left) that make healthy lifestyle choices together, stay healthy together. Here's his game-plan for your family.

    Don't go hungry
    To stay at a healthy weight, you have to eat, not starve yourself. "If you don't fuel up regularly, you'll become insatiably hungry, causing the 'hunger' hormone, ghrelin, to spike," Dr. Oz says. "The problem is, it takes a half-hour for that hormone to return to normal once you start to eat, but in that 30 minutes you'll likely chow through many more calories than if you hadn't eaten on an empty stomach."

    Dr. Oz keeps filling almonds on hand-don't be surprised if you see him nibbling a few on his show.

    Health.com: Dr. Oz's favorite healthy foods

    Automate breakfast and lunch
    Without a healthy go-to option for each,

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  • 6 Ways to Keep Your Lungs Strong and Healthy

    CorbisCorbisBy Anne Harding

    If you take good care of your lungs, they can last a lifetime. "The lungs are very durable if they're not attacked from the outside," says Norman H. Edelman, MD, chief medical officer of the American Lung Association (ALA). With a few exceptions, your lungs don't get into trouble unless you get them into trouble, he says.

    However, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth-leading cause of death in the U.S. after heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Here are 12 things you can do to keep your lungs healthy as you age.

    Health.com: 10 myths and facts about COPD

    Don't smoke...anything
    Smoking is, hands down, the worst thing you can do to your lungs on a regular basis.

    There's no safe threshold when it comes to smoking, Dr. Edelman says; the more you smoke, the greater your risk of lung cancer and COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Secondhand smoke is harmful, too, and there's mounting evidence that even thirdhand smoke-or just being in

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  • Your car made healthy

    IstockphotoIstockphotoBy Susan Hall

    Having a comfy car is a priority (second only, of course, to staying safe) if, like the average American woman, you spend an hour or more a day behind the wheel.

    Here, the latest road-tested must-haves to make your time in the car safer and less stressful.

    Health.com: How safe is your car?

    Use your head(set)
    Fiddling with your phone can jack up your accident risk by 300%. If you must call while moving, have your cell phone hooked up to a Bluetooth-compatible headset.

    Our pick: the Jawbone Icon ($99.99), which has noise-canceling technology and works with most newer model phones that allow you to automatically dial a number by saying the person's name.

    Bonus for screeners: A voice (you choose) whispers the caller IDs.

    Health.com: Your emergency car kit

    Make a clean sweep
    A recent study found that most cars harbor nearly 300 types of bacteria in just one square inch-some of which contribute to funky smells.

    Clean all surfaces, especially smudges on your windshield

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  • Injury-proof your gardening

    IstockphotoIstockphotoBy Milena Damjanov

    Getting on your hands and knees to plant, bending over to water-gardening can wreak havoc on your body. Sidestep mishaps with these tips from P. Allen Smith, author of the Garden Home series.

    Health.com: Plant a healing herb garden

    Protect your back
    Plant your garden in raised beds and containers-it's easier on your back than bending way over to the ground.

    Health.com: 5 quick ways to stop back pain

    Get a grip
    Pad the handles of tools with grip tape or foam rubber; this makes them easier to handle and prevents blisters.

    Get your blood flowing
    Warm up before you start gardening by walking or stretching. And don't do the same task in the same position for too long-that can lead to muscle and joint pain or repetitive-motion injuries.

    Health.com: Walk a little, lose a lot

    Keep it toxic-free
    Reduce your exposure to pesticides by adding plants that repel bad bugs. For instance, garlic plants keep aphids away.

    Health.com: Green guide to cleaning

    Shun the sun
    Avoid sun

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  • Farmed or wild: What’s the best salmon to buy?

    Getty ImagesGetty ImagesBy Carina Storrs

    Most everyone loves salmon. It's rich in protein and healthy fats, it's good for your health, and it tastes delicious.

    But sometimes it seems like you need a marine biology degree before you hit the market. Should you choose Atlantic, Alaskan, or sockeye? Which has more heart-healthy omega-3s and fewer toxins-farmed or wild salmon?

    And in addition to your own health, how does your choice-whether wild salmon from Alaska or farmed salmon from Chile- affect the environment?

    Here are a few things to keep in mind the next time you're stumped in the seafood aisle.

    Health.com: 20 healthy salmon recipes

    U.S. Atlantic salmon
    Other names:
    U.S. farmed salmon
    Should you buy it?
    Yes

    It wasn't long ago that buying U.S. Atlantic salmon was out of the question. Although wild populations are still nearly extinct, farms off the coast of Maine that grow U.S. Atlantic salmon are expanding.

    Nutritionally, they are just as good as wild. "I lump wild and farmed salmon together," says

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