Blog Posts by Lylah M. Alphonse, Senior Editor, Yahoo! Shine

  • Does union-busting affect women more than men?

    Union supporters wait in Wisconsin earlier this week. Photo: Scott Olson/GettyUnion supporters wait in Wisconsin earlier this week. Photo: Scott Olson/GettyThe Wisconsin Assembly voted Friday to approve a budget bill that ended most of the collective-bargaining rights of public workers in that state. Republican governor Scott Walker's plan touched off nearly two weeks of demonstrations at the Wisconsin State Capitol by more than 60,000 union workers and union supporters and prompted lawmakers in other states to modify bills that would have impacted collective bargaining.

    The bill passed the Assembly 51 to 17 in a vote that happened so quickly that many Democrats weren't even able to cast ballots, triggering chants of "Shame! Shame! Shame!"



    The legislation still faces a vote in the state senate, where the absence of all 14 Democratic senators has stalled the process. A quorum of 20 is needed to vote on spending bills; the state's 19 Republicans need at least one Democrat to be present.

    The debate has galvanized union workers across the country and prompted change in other states: Pending bills banning collective bargaining have been

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  • 10 things for men that used to be mainly for women

    Like this story? Follow us on Twitter for more. Also on Shine: Why it costs more to be a woman The Yahoo! Shine and Maxim survey: What men and women really think about dating Dear Diary: Is my boyfriend a metrosexual?

  • This little kid has it all figured out: "I don't want to marry someone if I don't have a job first"

    We've got to hand it to this little girl: She's certainly got her mind made up!


    "I don't want to marry someone if I don't have a job first," she says emphatically. "If he says, 'I will not come back to you,' fine, I'll find a different man. This is my life."

    Her older sister, singer/songwriter Anna Graceman, shot the clip, which she says on YouTube is part of a 15-minute video where the now-6-year-old "discusses her views on life and decides she isn't going to let anything come between her and her goals."

    So, what's this precocious kid's dream job? She's got that figured out, too.

    "I want to be a comedian or a writer," she says. "I don't even know how to write."

    If you could go back and give your 6-year-old self some career advice, what would it be?

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  • Are you still working on the perfect tan? Stop. Now.

    Growing up in New Jersey in the 1970s, it seemed like there was no such thing as sunscreen. Sure, Bain de Soleil had an SPF 4 or something like that-the highest sun-protection factor you could find was still in the single digits-but my friends and I slathered on the dark tanning oil, determined to achieve the "San Tropez Tan" that the product promised. Several of my friends slicked on baby oil instead, and then surrounded themselves with tin-foil reflectors to maximize the sun exposure.

    Fast forward a few decades. The link between tanning and skin cancer is so well understood that little-kid swimwear comes in long-sleeved styles. Some sunscreens are so thick that they sit on your skin like chalky armor; the SPF numbers are higher than most kindergarteners can count. And yet, many people-especially young women and teenage girls-remain convinced that the key to a healthy look is an all-over bronze sheen. And spray-on or lotion-based fake tans don't cut it; they want the real UV-ray

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  • How technology makes stalking easier (and how you can keep yourself safer)

    Today, technology makes it simple for us to stay connected to far-flung friends and family. But it also makes it easier than ever before to stalk, bully, or harass someone. Social media fosters a sense of community but also a false sense of privacy and security (you may think you're only chatting with a few friends on Twitter, but your tweets live on long after you delete them).

    Pre-internet, we might leave a paper trail that anyone with training could find. But now we leave cut huge swaths through cyberspace that anyone with a computer can follow. State laws about cyberstalking, cyberbullying, and cyber harassment vary (click here to look up the ones where you live), but since anyone can forward a text or copy-and-save a photo, the actual number of cyber stalkers out there is hard to calculate.

    Here are six ways you leave yourself open to stalkers online-and how to reduce your risk:

    1. Checking in on FourSquare and Facebook Places: The upside for some people is that everyone knows
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  • House of Representatives votes to strip Planned Parenthood of funding



    The House of Representatives voted Friday to end federal funding for Planned Parenthood, with republicans arguing that the amendment was necessary to prevent taxpayer money from funding abortions-even though, under Title X, the organization is already prohibited from using federal funds for such purposes.

    The amendment, which was introduced by republican representative Mike Pence of Indiana, passed 240 to 185, mostly along party lines. It still faces a vote in the Senate.

    "Nobody is saying Planned Parenthood can't be the leading advocate of abortion on demand, but why do I have to pay for it?" Pence said the day before the vote. He added that he hopes Roe v. Wade is eventually overturned.

    But federal funding for Planned Parenthood falls under Title X, which specifically bars the use of its funds to provide abortions. The vote would strip Planned Parenthood and similar organizations of about $327 million through the end of September, eliminating funding for counseling, education,

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  • Should the media pull women journalists out of war zones?

    Lara Logan with Army Captain John Hintz in Afghanistan in 2010. Photo from CBS News Lara Logan with Army Captain John Hintz in Afghanistan in 2010. Photo from CBS News After Lara Logan, a seasoned reporter and chief foreign correspondent for CBS news, was attacked and sexually assaulted in Cairo on Friday, news networks reportedly met to discuss pulling their female journalists out of Egypt, a move that some journalists say is understandable and expected but potentially insulting and dangerous.

    "It is an expected networks response. In 2001, when a (male) Swedish journalist was killed in northern Afghanistan, several networks pulled out their reporters from the region." says longtime war correspondent Anna Badkhen, the author of Peace Meals and Waiting for the Taliban. "I understand why executives at a network, or a newspaper, or a magazine, may feel uncomfortable with subjecting their reporters to potential danger."

    Susan Milligan, a political reporter who has covered war in Iraq and the Balkans and is now a contributing editor at US News & World Report, says she thinks it is "insulting specifically to Lara Logan, who is a terrific reporter. If

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  • Does South Dakota House Bill 1171 justify killing abortion providers?

    Pro-life and pro-choice demonstrators argue in front of the Supreme Court during the March for Life in Washington, D.C., on January 24, 2011. Photo by Chip Somodevilla, Getty ImagesPro-life and pro-choice demonstrators argue in front of the Supreme Court during the March for Life in Washington, D.C., on January 24, 2011. Photo by Chip Somodevilla, Getty ImagesThe South Dakota House of Representatives is set to consider new legislation that would expand the definition of "justifiable homicide" to include killings intended to protect the life of a fetus, causing some to worry that the new law would, in effect, offer protection to those who target and kill abortion providers.

    Edited to add: On Feb. 16, the South Dakota legislature decided to shelve the bill indefinitely, the New York Times reported. A spokesman for Gov. Dennis Daugaard said, "Clearly the bill as it's currently written is a very bad idea."

    State Representative Phil Jensen, the staunchly pro-life chief sponsor of the Republican-backed House Bill 1171, told The Washington Post that the bill was meant to bring "consistency" to South Dakota criminal code, which already allows people to be charged with manslaughter if they cause the death of a fetus.

    But at Mother Jones, Kate Sheppard points out that the bill could, in theory, "allow a woman's father, mother, son, daughter, or

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  • How would the president's budget proposal affect you?

    President Obama's budget,r eady for delivry to Congress. Photo by Getty ImagesPresident Obama's budget,r eady for delivry to Congress. Photo by Getty ImagesCalling his plan one made up of "tough choices and sacrifices," President Barack Obama sent Congress a $3.73 trillion budget on Monday that proposed to reduce the deficit by cutting spending and increasing taxes, but seemed to ignore his own deficit commission's suggestions when it came to slashing entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security.

    "The fiscal realities we face require hard choices," President Obama said in his remarks to Congress. "A decade of deficits, compounded by the effects of the recession and the steps we had to take to break it, as well as the chronic failure to confront difficult decisions, has put us on an unsustainable course."

    The proposal, which is made up of about two-thirds spending cuts and one-third tax increases, and also includes plans to invest heavily in education and innovation. "Growing the economy and spurring job creation by America's businesses, large and small, is my top priority," the 0resident said.

    Republicans, who late last week

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  • Survey: 97 percent of women say mean things about their own bodies

    Photo from ThinkstockPhoto from ThinkstockHow often do you look at yourself in the mirror and think that you don't like the way you look? According to Glamour, 97 percent of women have at least one "I hate my body" moment per day.

    The beauty magazine asked 300 women of all ages and body types to pay attention to their internal monologues and keep track of every negative or anxious comment they made about their own bodies in one day. The results? Women surveyed had an average of 13 negative thoughts about themselves on a daily basis, and some really set their inner mean girls loose on themselves, with as many as 100 nasty, ego-bruising comments in a day.

    Why do we say things about ourselves that we'd never say about our friends?

    "It's actually more acceptable to insult your body than to praise it," points out Ann Kearney-Cooke, a psychologist based in Cincinnati who specializes in body image (she also helped Glamour design the survey).

    Women tend to bond over depreciating comments, and even if you aren't selling yourself

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Pagination

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