Blog Posts by The Editors of EatingWell Magazine

  • The Dangerous Ingredient You’re Eating—And Don’t Even Know It

    The Dangerous Ingredient You're Eating—And Don't Even Know ItBy Gretel H. Schueller, Contributing Writer for EatingWell

    Camembert cheese and buttery croissants are staples of French cuisine, so you'd think France would be the last place where the government would police fat content in food. Yet, in an effort to reduce obesity, France's Senate recently approved an amendment to triple taxes on products containing one unhealthy fat in particular: palm kernel oil, which is extracted from the palm seed of palm oil trees. (The lower house of parliament still has to vote on the tax.)

    Don't Miss: 7 of the Healthiest Foods You Should Be Eating (But Probably Aren't)

    It turns out that palm oil is a major ingredient in one beloved treat in France: Nutella. The French, who love to smear the creamy hazelnut-chocolate spread on toast and crepes or just eat it with a spoon, account for 26 percent of world's Nutella consumption, according to French newspaper Le Monde. The proposed tax has incited outrage among Nutella lovers. As outrageous as the

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  • 30-Minute Stovetop Chicken Parmesan

    30-Minute Stovetop Chicken ParmesanBy Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor of EatingWell

    In its classic form, chicken parm (short for Parmesan, but of course you knew that) is a dish you order at a family-style Italian restaurant when you want a big piece of chicken breast fried, coated in buttery, cheesy breadcrumbs, topped with melted mozzarella and served with a pile of pasta and tomato sauce and a solid dusting of Parmesan cheese. To replicate this dish at home, you'd go through the process of dredging and breading the chicken breasts, then getting them crispy and golden in a frying pan with plenty of oil, followed by baking them in the oven topped with gooey cheese--not to mention the homemade sauce. So delicious. So much work.

    Want to enjoy this favorite dinner at home for a fraction of the effort (and calories)? EatingWell's genius recipe makeover of chicken Parmesan (pictured above) gives you all that Italian-restaurant enjoyment without the overstuffed feeling, lots of time in the kitchen--or having to wait

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  • Fresh Vs. Canned Vs. Frozen: Which is Better?

    Fresh vs. Canned vs. Frozen: Which Is Better?By Hilary Meyer, Associate Food Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    Nothing beats fresh produce. Still, in the kitchen, using canned or frozen fruits and vegetables can be a lot more convenient--but is it worth it? Are you giving up nutrition for convenience? Although a fresh fruit or vegetable would never be considered unhealthy, surprisingly there are a few circumstances where frozen and even canned could offer you more health benefits than fresh. Here's a closer look at a few examples of fresh foods vs. their canned or frozen counterparts.

    Fresh Tomatoes vs. Canned Tomatoes
    If you've ever eaten a tomato in February, then you are well aware of the challenges that a fresh tomato faces. It's a seasonal food. But even in season, canned tomatoes offer something that fresh can't. Tomatoes are preserved using heat, which releases lycopene--a carotenoid that may help prevent prostate and breast cancer. And canned tomatoes are super-easy: they're already peeled, chopped and ready to

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  • Make-Ahead Dinner: Healthier Comfort-Food Sausage Casserole

    Make-Ahead Dinner: Healthier Comfort-Food Sausage CasseroleBy Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor of EatingWell

    Quick. Easy. Tasty. There's just something about casseroles. People love them: we're all just looking for comfort and deliciousness in one dish. While the word might conjure nostalgic memories of a well-coifed 1950s housewife in a frilly apron combining cans of creamy soup with leftovers to make dinner, our palates today call for dishes that are healthier and even more delicious.

    Don't Miss: Classic Chicken Casserole Recipes Made Healthier
    How to Make Awesome Meatloaf

    EatingWell's healthy casserole recipes aren't "open cans and dump everything in one pan" casseroles. For dinner tonight try our Sauerkraut & Sausage Casserole (pictured above, recipe below). It's warming and tangy and satisfying with sausage (turkey kielbasa), sauerkraut and mustard and topped with thinly sliced potatoes. If you have a food processor with a slicing attachment or a mandoline, it's easy to slice the potatoes thinly and deal them out over the filling

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  • Amazing Quinoa & Squash Casserole and More Quinoa Recipes You Must Try

    Amazing Quinoa & Squash Casserole and More Quinoa Recipes You Must TryBy Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor of EatingWell

    You heard the buzz (Everybody's talking about quinoa!) and succumbed to the lure of its popularity (Everybody's eating quinoa!), so you bought some quinoa. Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is a delicately flavored grain and one of the only plant foods that is a complete protein, meaning it has balanced quantities of 9 essential amino acids. Both white and red quinoa are available in most natural-foods stores and the natural-foods sections of many supermarkets. Toasting the grain before cooking enhances its flavor and rinsing removes any residue of saponin, quinoa's natural, bitter protective covering.

    Learn All About It: How to Cook Quinoa

    So now that you have the hot grain-of-the-moment in your very own kitchen-you need to know what to do with it. I think you should make an amazing casserole with it. Here's a new recipe, from the September/October issue of EatingWell, for a vegetarian quinoa casserole topped with pureed squash that

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  • The Biggest Thanksgiving Calorie Bomb & Fun Thanksgiving Trivia

    The Biggest Thanksgiving Calorie BombThe Biggest Thanksgiving Calorie BombBy Hilary Meyer, Associate Food Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    There's a lot that's changed about Thanksgiving in the years since the Pilgrims gathered for their first meal of thanks. For instance, they weren't were watching the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade while they basted their bird (that started in 1924) or rummaging through sale racks for a bargain sweater the day after on Black Friday. Here are a few fun Thanksgiving food facts to mull over while you enjoy your meal.

    1. Thanksgiving Hasn't Always Been a National Holiday
    What do nursery rhymes and Thanksgiving have in common? Sarah Josepha Hale, a magazine editor who also happened to write "Mary Had a Little Lamb." She lobbied for making Thanksgiving a national holiday. Seventeen years and five presidents later, Abraham Lincoln finally established Thanksgiving as a holiday in 1863. You go, girl.

    2. Thanksgiving Hasn't Always Been on the Same Date
    Abraham Lincoln declared in 1863 that Thanksgiving fall on

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  • Burn 700 Calories Cooking Thanksgiving Dinner

    Burn 700 Calories Cooking Thanksgiving DinnerBy Matthew Thompson, Associate Food Editor for EatingWell Magazine

    I love being in the kitchen on Thanksgiving. Between the delicious smells, nice company and constant foot traffic (everyone finds a reason to stop by the kitchen on Thanksgiving!), it's the place to be in the lead-up to the year's most sumptuous meal. But anyone who's ever hoisted a turkey out of the oven or chopped so many veggies their wrists have cramped knows that making Thanksgiving dinner can be hard work. And though a lot of attention is paid to the calories consumed on Thanksgiving, not that much thought is given to the calories burned. It turns out to be a lot.

    Don't Miss: The Best & Worst Thanksgiving Foods for Your Health

    We decided to calculate the number of calories burned while making Thanksgiving dinner for the November/December issue of EatingWell. Using some of the Mayo Clinic's research into working metabolic rates (and some simple calculating), we were able to work out just how much you

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  • The 7 Healthiest Foods on Your Thanksgiving Menu

    The 7 Healthiest Foods on Your Thanksgiving MenuBy Matthew Thompson, Associate Food Editor for EatingWell Magazine

    Thanksgiving is quickly becoming my favorite holiday. And why not? It's a great time to hang out with family, watch football and, of course, eat an amazing meal.

    Most people think of Thanksgiving dinner as being a bit of a calorie bomb. And, really, it is: in a recent issue of EatingWell we estimated that the Turkey Day meal clocks at least 2,800 calories.

    How to Cut 1,273 Calories at Thanksgiving Dinner (and Never Miss Them)

    Sure, it's only once a year and no big deal when balanced against healthy eating habits the rest of the time. But that argument obscures an important fact: even while it's high in calories, the Thanksgiving menu is full of healthy foods. Check out some of the healthiest foods on your Thanksgiving menu.

    1. Turkey--Turkey is one of the most straightforward dishes on the Thanksgiving table. Sure, there are ways to up the sinful factor (some recipes call for slathering the bird

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  • 4 Mistakes that Ruin Stuffing (And How to Fix Them)

    4 Mistakes That Ruin Stuffing (And How to Fix Them)By Hilary Meyer, Associate Food Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    What's the best part of Thanksgiving? The turkey? No way. It's the stuffing. And to think there was a time when I thought stuffing could only be made from a box! Don't get me wrong--boxed stuffing is good, but premade packages of stuffing are a real damper in the creativity department. (Not to mention they're loaded with sodium and other not-so-wholesome ingredients in the form of preservatives.)

    Recipes to Try: Easy Thanksgiving Stuffing Recipes

    Homemade stuffing is ridiculously easy to make, but there are a few things you can do that would ruin a perfectly good stuffing. Here are a few mistakes to avoid when you're making stuffing from scratch, and tips to fix your stuffing.

    Watch: How to Make Perfect Thanksgiving Stuffing

    Mistake to Avoid #1: Cooking Your Stuffing in the Turkey
    OK, so this tip really applies to any stuffing, but it's worth mentioning because it could destroy the potential to ever

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  • Healthy Meals to Use Up Thanksgiving Leftovers

    Healthy Meals to Use Up Thanksgiving LeftoversBy Wendy Ruopp, Managing Editor of EatingWell

    We have an open-door policy when it comes to Thanksgiving: we welcome in anyone who turns up. Especially this year, when the wild fall weather has made travel planning difficult and unpredictable, chances are a lot more people will be staying closer to home. Their last-minute plans mean I'll want to cook a big turkey, to make sure we have enough. Chances are good that I'll go overboard (Thanksgiving math always trips me up--is it 20 ounces per person or 20 minutes per pound?) and that means leftovers.

    Good--I love leftovers. They call for creativity and resourcefulness so it doesn't taste like you're eating the same thing night after night. Here are 5 dinner recipes that use leftover turkey in deliciously new, healthy ways.


    Cream of Turkey & Wild Rice SoupTurkey Soup: My mom always ended Thanksgiving Day with a big pot of soup simmering on the back of the stove and I like to do that too. This year, try using your leftovers in this healthy recipe for Cream

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