Blog Posts by The Editors of EatingWell Magazine

  • Sweet, sweet raspberries…

    Whether you prefer to purchase raspberries by the pint from the grocery store or at a farmers' market, pop a few juicy berries in your mouth and enjoy a sweet-tart sensation of summer anytime. This summer, find a farm to pick your own and spend a day in the sun picking (and eating) fresh, juicy raspberries off the bush. Just don't forget to save some to make your favorite sweet and savory raspberry recipes.

    Besides being sweet and delicious, raspberries are a great source of fiber-some of it soluble in the form of pectin, which helps lower cholesterol-and an excellent source of vitamin C. The gorgeous red color is from anthocyanins, an antioxidant. And did you know that raspberry-seed oil has a natural SPF of 25 to 50?

    This is the first summer I'll be eating and cooking raspberries from free raspberry plants I scored last year (all I had to do was dig 'em up and haul them away). Soon to be cooked in my kitchen…

    1. Hands down my favorite EatingWell raspberry recipe,

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  • Skin savers: 4 recipes to help ward off wrinkles

    Searching for a way to look young for your age? Hit the produce aisle, suggests new research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I-a survey that asks people to quantify how often they eat various foods-researchers from Unilever linked consuming plenty of vitamin C-rich foods (such as oranges, tomatoes and strawberries) with youthful skin.

    "Our findings suggest that a higher intake of vitamin C from foods is associated with a lower risk of having wrinkled skin and age-related skin dryness in [middle-aged] women," says Maeve Cosgrove, Ph.D., who led the research.

    Vitamin C's youthful effects on skin may be due to its antioxidant properties, which help protect against ultraviolet rays, and its role in keeping skin firm via collagen synthesis, say the researchers.

    Bottom line: Eating more vitamin-C rich foods, such as oranges, tomatoes, strawberries and broccoli, may be a secret to smoother

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  • Stay healthy in 10 easy steps

    Go fish. Consuming two or more servings of fish per week is associated with a 30 percent lower risk of developing coronary heart disease over the long term, studies show. Go fish. Consuming two or more servings of fish per week is associated with a 30 percent lower risk of developing coronary heart disease over the long term, studies show. Heart disease? That's something we need to worry about when we get older, right? Wrong. By adopting heart-healthy habits starting as early as your twenties, you'll be less likely to face the challenges of heart disease.

    Coronary heart disease doesn't just affect men, it's the number one cause of death in U.S. women. But the good news-which Dr. Philip Ades, author of the new book EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook, has made it his mission to spread-is that heart disease is mostly preventable. Research shows that up to 90 percent of heart disease can be prevented by changing one's diet, exercising more, maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking. Reduce your risk by following these 10 simple steps, cooking delicious heart-healthy recipes and snacking heart-smart.

    Step #1: Know your numbers. High blood cholesterol is linked with about one-third of heart disease cases worldwide, according to data from the United Nations. Your blood cholesterol (lipid profile) is made up

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  • Easy Entertaining, Denmark-Style

    Elderflower SparklersElderflower SparklersI hadn't planned on visiting Copenhagen during my 2-month post-college backpacking trip, but as we made our way north, I decided to ditch my traveling companion for a few days (breaks are always good) and check it out. I was only there for a short time, but I was really taken by the beauty of the city, the friendly demeanor of the people and the simplicity of the cuisine. When I first read Joyce Hendley's story on Denmark's fresh, simple cuisine in EatingWell magazine, the memories flooded back.

    To really bring back the memories, I planned a casual dinner party with a few friends. The menu was delightful. We started out the evening with Elderflower Sparklers. Elder-what? The blossom of the elder tree, elderflower concentrate or syrup is a popular drink ingredient throughout northern Europe and has a delicate, lightly floral aroma and mild honey flavor. Look for it in specialty shops that feature northern European foods (such as Ikea) or at lepicerie.com. Apricot nectar can be

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  • 4 secrets to picnic-perfect fried chicken

    EatingWell's Oven-Fried ChickenEatingWell's Oven-Fried ChickenAlthough fried chicken is a perfect picnic food, it's not perfect health-wise. But there's a solution to making fried chicken healthy without sacrificing flavor: oven frying. Like any fried chicken, our healthier oven-fried chicken tastes as good cold as it does hot, so it's perfect to pack in a cooler and take along on a picnic. In fact, it smells so great when it's baking that you may not be able to wait until it's cold to dig in.

    So why not just fry the chicken? The numbers are enough to convince us. Here's how our Oven-Fried Chicken stacks up against traditional fried chicken:

    Our 4 secrets to make "fried" chicken that's delicious and healthy:

    • Start out by marinating the chicken in buttermilk, along with mustard and hot sauce-this keeps it juicy and moist. Plus it adds flavor.
    • Remove and discard the chicken skin, which is high in saturated fat. Typical fried chicken has 7 grams of saturated fat per serving. Our recipe has only 2 grams.
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  • 5 refreshing recipes for crunchy cucumbers

    From crisp kirbys to nearly seedless greenhouse cukes, there are plenty of alternatives to the thick-skinned types that typically dominate supermarket bins. Although healthy cucumber recipes abound, nearly any variety is delicious simply sprinkled with a little salt and pepper.

    While the cucumber isn't known as a nutrition powerhouse, it does provide a small amount of fiber, minerals and vitamins-particularly vitamin C (about 6 percent of the Daily Value per cup). But perhaps its most important nutritional contribution is refreshment: at 95 percent water content, a cup of cucumber slices is nearly as thirst-quenching as a glass of water. Just thinking about cukes makes me feel cooler.

    If your cucumber repertoire is limited to tossing slices into green salads, here are 5 simple inspirations that reach beyond.

    1. The second best thing to fresh cucumbers? Pickles. This recipe for Quick Pickles is ready in 45 minutes and keeps for more than a week.
    2. Smooth avocado,
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  • 4 easy rubs and marinades add flavor without fat

    Red Wine MarinadeRed Wine MarinadeWarm weather (and even cold weather) inspires us to cook on the grill. Who wants to make the house hotter than it has to be?

    To add flavor to meats, poultry, seafood and veggies without adding fat or calories, try simple, healthy rubs and marinades to ensure tasty, juicy results.

    Sure, you can turn to store-bought versions (which we sometimes do when we're pressed for time), but for more reliably tasty results, we like to make our own.

    Though they are both used to enhance flavor, rubs and marinades are quite different; either can be the first step in many delicious, healthy grilling recipes.

    Marinades

    Marinades are liquid mixtures that normally include some sort of acid, like wine or vinegar, plus oil and herbs or spices. Besides making food more flavorful, the acid breaks down the muscle tissue, which makes it more tender and moist. (Marinating time varies depending on how delicate or tough the food is-consult EatingWell's marinating and grilling guide to

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  • 6 expert tips and healthy recipes for the best burgers

    Spanish Pork BurgerSpanish Pork BurgerSummer's here. Father's Day is upon us and Burger Season is officially in full swing. While EatingWell has dozens of healthy burger recipes, our Spanish Pork Burger is one of my favorite ways to mix up my burger repertoire. It's boldly flavored with sautéed onions that keep it moist, plus Spanish paprika, garlic and green olives. The creamy mayonnaise spread is tangy with lemon and a hint of earthy saffron.

    On top of fabulous flavor, this burger's got decent nutrition marks. With just 364 calories, it makes a generous and utterly scrumptious meal that even works for someone on a diet. Just add a little green salad to get your vegetable servings in. An added bonus: 3 cups of sliced onions and whole-wheat burger buns give these burgers 5 grams of fiber per serving.

    EatingWell worked with meat expert and cookbook author Bruce Aidells on keeping burgers healthy and delicious, and he developed this Spanish Pork Burger recipe as well as 5 other amazing burgers. When we spoke with

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  • Simple and delicious Father's Day menu (that keeps Dad healthy, to boot!)

    Shish Kebab with Tahini SauceShish Kebab with Tahini SauceMy dad is master of his grill. It doesn't matter if it's raining, snowing, sleeting or thundering, my dad is happy to grill dinner. He totally dorks out on grilling books, studies brining techniques and makes his own rubs. He always calls me after making a new recipe to analyze the high and low points the next day. It's too cute.

    But when Father's Day rolls around, I like to let Dad relax and grill him a meal that tastes great, and is healthy to boot. Keep your dad healthy, too, with this menu of healthy Father's Day recipes.

    • Relax with a cocktail: A Lemon-Orange Fizz (vodka optional) is swell for letting Dad relax on the deck, plus it's packed with vitamins to keep his heart healthy.
    • Start feeding him early: Grill eggplant and garlic to make baba ganouj and serve with pita chips and fresh veggies so Dad doesn't get hungry while you cook.
    • Make your main dish ahead of time: These tasty shish kebabs can marinate for up to a day (which also ups the
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  • Got tomatoes? What you need to know about tomato safety. Plus, great recipe alternatives.

    Many tomatoes are safe to eat: Types of tomatoes not linked to any illnesses are cherry tomatoes, grape tomatoes, tomatoes with the vine still attached and tomatoes grown at home.Many tomatoes are safe to eat: Types of tomatoes not linked to any illnesses are cherry tomatoes, grape tomatoes, tomatoes with the vine still attached and tomatoes grown at home.A recent nationwide outbreak of salmonellosis has been linked to certain raw red tomatoes and products containing them. Although the specifics are still under investigation, here is what you need to know:

    The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is advising that consumers limit their consumption of raw tomatoes to cherry tomatoes, grape tomatoes, tomatoes with the vine still attached and tomatoes grown at home. These tomatoes are not the likely source of this outbreak.

    Avoid raw red plum, Roma or round tomatoes if you do not know what state/country they come from, as only tomatoes from certain states/countries are presently associated with the outbreak.

    The FDA recommends eating raw red plum, Roma and round tomatoes ONLY only if grown and harvested from the areas that HAVE NOT BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH THE OUTBREAK. Find an updated list of states and countries on the FDA's website.

    Find more information from the FDA (http://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/tomatoes.html) or

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