Blog Posts by The Editors of EatingWell Magazine

  • Should You Be Taking Krill Oil Supplements? (No, Not in a Sandwich Will Ferrell!)

    Should You be Taking Krill Oil Supplements? (No, Not in a Sandwich Will Ferrell!)By Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D., Nutrition Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    I recently received a question from a reader: what is krill oil and should I be taking it? While the school kids in the recent Let's Move video with Michelle Obama and Will Ferrell weren't excited about krill-oil supplements--in sandwiches--for lunch, there may be reasons to consider taking the supplement. As its name implies, krill oil is oil extracted from krill--tiny sea-dwelling crustaceans--and made into a soft-gel capsule. Krill are a rich source of DHA and EPA, omega-3 fats that promote heart and brain health and reduce inflammation.

    Krill oil is often touted as a supplement superior to fish oil: preliminary research suggests that our bodies better absorb omega-3s from krill oil than from fish oil. In other words, you'd need a smaller dose of omega-3s if they're coming from krill. But here's the catch: to get enough omega-3s you'd still have to actually swallow more krill-oil pills than fish-oil pills,

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  • 7 Small but Powerful Diet Habits that Add Up to Major Weight-Loss Success

    7 Small But Powerful Diet Habits That Add Up to Major Weight-Loss SuccessLisa D'Agrosa, M.S., R.D., Associate Nutrition Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    When it comes to weight loss, it's the little things that can really add up to make a big difference. Think "diet" and you might assume it requires a radical revamp of your life or misery-inducing restrictions. But when it comes to lasting weight loss, research shows you're better off making small, consistent changes rather than aiming for a major diet or lifestyle overhaul. The key is that the changes are practical and sustainable so that you can permanently adopt them into your everyday life. In one study, people who made tiny adjustments to their eating habits were able to stick to their new routines-and had more success slimming down compared to those who didn't incorporate the tips. To help shed pounds, without making any huge changes, follow these 7 easy habits for weight-loss success.

    1. Eat Breakfast Every Day
    Research shows dieters are more successful at losing weight-and keeping it off-when

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  • Diet or Exercise: What's the Best Way to Lose Weight?

    Diet or Exercise: What's the Best Way to Lose Weight?By Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D., Nutrition Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    I recently received a question from the reader--diet or exercise: what's the best way to lose weight? If you really want to see that number on the scale drop, what you put in your mouth matters most. People who simply cut calories to slim down lose about 2 pounds a week, says a study in the International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders. At the same time, people who exercise but don't restrict calories drop less than half a pound each week. Get a meal plan that fits your calorie needs to lose weight.

    Why doesn't physical activity produce the same pound-dropping results as calorie restriction? One thought is that though exercise burns calories, it doesn't rev your metabolism, says a study in Obesity Reviews. It also doesn't prevent your metabolism from slowing as you lose pounds. As you slim down--via any method--your metabolism slows incrementally with your weight loss and, despite what many

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  • Why You Need Skillpower, Not Willpower, to Lose Weight

    Why You Need Skillpower, Not Willpower, to Lose WeightBy Gretel H. Schueller, Contributing Writer for EatingWell

    We all know that to lose weight we need to eat healthfully and exercise. So why do so many of us hit dieting dead ends? What are we doing wrong? Dr. David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., a doctor of preventive medicine at Yale University, public health guru and EatingWell advisor, has the answer. "It takes skill to turn what you know into what you can do," he says. "The problem is that we rely too much on willpower. Think of a really hard thing, like going up Mt. Everest," Katz explains. "We may want it really badly, but we will fail if we have no mountaineering skills." It's the same when trying to lose weight. "People blame themselves, but they're using only willpower," he says. In a world that works largely against us--Katz points to advertisers telling us that psychedelic marshmallows are part of a healthy breakfast--the pervasive reliance on willpower often results in failure. Instead, we need "skill power" to succeed. In his new

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  • Is Doing a Cleanse a Good Idea?

    Is Doing a Cleanse a Good Idea?Is Doing a Cleanse a Good Idea?Lisa D'Agrosa, M.S., R.D., Associate Nutrition Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    My friends and family often use me as a sounding board for their own personal diet questions-this is what happens when you're a Registered Dietitian. One question that seems to come up often is some variation of, "Should I go on a cleanse?" Whether they want to lose weight or they think it's a way to detox their body, plenty of people look to cleanses as magical cure-alls. But are cleanses as healthy as they're hyped up to be? Here are some reasons you might want to rethink starting a cleanse, plus a healthy plan to clean up your diet.

    Slower Metabolism
    Certain cleanses are super-extreme: nothing but lemon water for two weeks-no, thank you! Almost all cleanse diets require you to drastically cut calories, which will slow down your metabolism. When you severely restrict calories, your body goes into a type of "starvation mode." It tries to hang on to the energy-read: fat-that it has. As a result, the

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  • 3 Ways to Limit Processed Foods (& the Ones You Should Keep in Your Diet)

    3 Ways to Limit Processed Foods (& the Ones You Should Keep in Your Diet)Lisa D'Agrosa, M.S., R.D., Associate Nutrition Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    You've probably heard that you should limit processed foods in your diet, but you might be wondering exactly what those foods are--and how to cut back on them. Many packaged foods are full of ingredients you can't pronounce and are loaded with sodium, sugar and unhealthy saturated fat, so it's worth trying to avoid them when possible. Here are some simple swaps you can make to cut back on unhealthy processed foods. And, because not everything that comes in a box or plastic tub is bad for you, learn which packaged foods can actually be part of a healthy diet.

    At Breakfast
    Trade cereal for oatmeal. Many cereals on the market are packed with sugar and/or missing out on fiber. Sure, you can pick a healthier breakfast cereal (and there are plenty of healthy choices), but oatmeal is a whole food with only one ingredient--oats. If you stick to plain oats--not the type that come in flavored packets--you'll

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  • 7 Ways Food Labels Can Trick You

    7 Ways Food Labels Can Trick YouBy Rachael Moeller Gorman

    Food companies know that health--or the appearance of health--sells. According to the International Food Information Council's (IFIC) 2012 Food & Health Survey, the healthfulness of foods and drinks influenced 61 percent of buying decisions.

    But labels can mislead. Studies show that buzzwords like "organic" can make consumers believe food is also low in calories or "high in protein" is perceived as beneficial to their health, even though the food may be highly processed, full of sugar and/or high in calories. Even when these labels are factually correct, people over-infer the healthiness of the food because "these labels create health halos, and they extend way past what the food actually does," says Brian Wansink, Ph.D., EatingWell advisor and director of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell. And that can lead to over-consumption.

    Here are 7 examples of how labels can mislead.

    1. Be Wary of Nutrient Callouts
    That tabbed banner of nutrition

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  • Super Bowl Hangover? Your 1-Day Eating Plan to Get Back on Track

    Super Bowl Hangover? Your 1-Day Eating Plan to Get Back on TrackBy Lisa D'Agrosa, M.S., R.D., EatingWell Magazine

    There are times, like after a big food-filled party weekend, when I feel like my typically healthy diet needs a bit of a refresh. Instead of skipping meals, feeling guilty or drastically cutting calories-habits that can be detrimental to your health-try making some small changes to each meal to get back on track without a diet overhaul. Here's a daily plan with tricks for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks that will save some calories and help you get right back on track. A day like this one allows you to eat lots of delicious food while still cutting calories to get back on track to losing weight. Incorporating these swaps throughout the day can add up to a 500-calorie savings, which over the course of a week can help you lose about 1 pound.

    See: 6 Foods to Ditch to Clean Up Your Diet

    Breakfast: I always start my day with a healthy breakfast-but when I'm trying to restart my healthy habits, I use a few tricks to cut

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  • How 3 Friends Started Their Own Weight Loss Program and Lost 60 Pounds

    How 3 Friends Started Their Own Weight Loss Program and Lost 60 PoundsBy Breana Lai, M.P.H., R.D., Associate Food Editor, EatingWell Magazine

    Research shows that, when you're trying to lose weight, social support can be very helpful in shedding pounds and keeping them off. That social support-via a diet club, in this case-is what helped three women featured in EatingWell Magazine each lose 20 pounds and keep it off. (Read their story here.) The three women-Judy Lester, Nancy Roscigno and Julie Slocum- all mothers-of-two who live in a wooded neighborhood in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, started cooking for each other in 2010 as part of their self-designed "diet dinner club," an alternative to meal delivery services and formal weight loss programs. Together, over six months, they exchanged weekly meals and exercised together and met their weight-loss goals. They each lost 20 pounds and have continued working together to keep the weight off.

    So instead of trying to lose weight all on your own, consider starting your own diet club! You'll connect with

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  • 5 Super Bowl Snacks that Aren't as Unhealthy as You Think

    5 Super Bowl Snacks That Aren't As Unhealthy As You ThinkBy the Editors of EatingWell

    For many of us, the fun of Super Bowl Sunday comes from watching the game, the commercials--and from enjoying 4+ hours of non-stop snacking! But not every football snack is an all-out calorie blitz. With the right game plan, you can indulge while keeping your tight end.

    We looked at 10 of the top Super Bowl snacks and put them in a face-off to see which would win in terms of health. Here are our top 5 healthy picks for Super Bowl snacks.

    Chicken wings (3 = 150 cals.) VS. Baby back ribs (1 = 170 cals.)
    Winner: Wings!
    Post-Game Analysis: Not only do you get to eat more for a similar number of calories, wings are lower in sat. fat (2 g vs. 4 g).
    Extra Points: Skip the blue-cheese sauce for an even skinnier treat.

    See How to Make Easy Stovetop Buffalo Chicken Wings

    Tortilla chips (1 oz. = 140 cals.) VS. Potato chips (1 oz. = 150 cals.)
    Winner: Tortilla chips!
    Post-Game Analysis: Tortilla chips narrowly claim victory with less

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