Blog Posts by Redbook

  • Teaching Kids About Discrimination

    By Charlotte Hilton Andersen, REDBOOKFamily from American MuslimFamily from American Muslim

    Cue the public outcry: According to the Florida Family Association, TLC's new show, All-American Muslim is a threat to life, limb, and national security. The show, deemed so controversial that national hardware chain Lowe's pulled all its advertising, covers topics like jobs, babies, school, finances, and a family dinner out.

    Wait. I thought this was a threat to our society. Where's the bomb lab or screaming rhetoric? This seems almost boring compared to what's featured in the daily media... and apparently that's the problem.

    Related: 100+ Gifts Under $50

    According to the FFA, the show is "propaganda that riskily hides the Islamic agenda's clear and present danger to American liberties and traditional values." And how does this show do that? It spent an entire episode dedicated to the birth of a family's first child. You see, this show portrays "only Muslims that appear to be ordinary folks while excluding many Islamic believers whose agenda Read More »from Teaching Kids About Discrimination
  • The "All-American Muslim" Controversy

    By Charlotte Hilton Andersen, REDBOOK

    Family from American Muslim

    Cue the public outcry: According to the Florida Family Association, TLC's new show, All-American Muslim is a threat to life, limb, and national security. The show, deemed so controversial that national hardware chain Lowe's pulled all its advertising, covers topics like jobs, babies, school, finances, and a family dinner out. Wait, where's the bomb lab or screaming rhetoric? This seems almost boring-and apparently that's the problem.

    According to the FFA, the show is "propaganda that riskily hides the Islamic agenda's clear and present danger to American liberties and traditional values." And how does a show that spent an entire episode dedicated to the birth of a family's first child do that? By showing "only Muslims that appear to be ordinary folks while excluding many Islamic believers whose agenda poses a clear and present danger to liberties and traditional values that the majority of Americans cherish." All I can say is that it's a

    Read More »from The "All-American Muslim" Controversy
  • Why Can't We Celebrate Everything?

    By Diane Farr, REDBOOK

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    My son, Beckett, wasn't invited to his best friend's Hanukkah party last year. He was only 3 years old at the time, so it was hard to explain that the reason we weren't asked over for dreidel games was because we aren't Jewish. I broke the news to him at the zoo, hoping some popcorn and a good view of a baby giraffe would help him get over it. It did. I, however, was still fuming.

    When I started dating my now-husband, Seung Yong, his Korean parents vehemently opposed our interracial relationship. They seemed against his marriage to this Irish-Italian girl, right until the moment I was wearing their family heirloom on my left hand-at which point they accepted me completely. Eventually I saw that what my in-laws had feared was that I wouldn't preserve their family's traditions. I could appreciate that concern, and I still do. I hired a coach and learned enough Korean to communicate directly with Seung's parents. And on our first family trip to Korea, I

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  • Settle an Argument: To Hoard or Not to Hoard?

    By Lauren Le Vine, REDBOOK

    Amanda, 28, and her husband, David, 32, have been married for two years. When they go to big box stores like Costco, David wants to stick to a budget, but Amanda wants to stock up for the future. Who's right?

    Related: 17 5-Minute Marriage Makeovers

    He says: "Even though big box stores like Costco have lower prices than smaller chains, I just finished business school-so I'm all about budgets and bottom lines. I like to go into Costco with a fixed budget and an exact list of what we need to get on that trip. Amanda, on the other hand, likes to meander down the aisles, pointing out deals like "12 boxes of tissues for $29.99." Yes, we may need them later, but we don't have room for 12 boxes of tissues. I don't want to end up like those people on Hoarders or Extreme Couponing because my wife was afraid we'd run out of tissues at 3 a.m. one night and not have 11 boxes on standby."

    She says: "It's not that I'm not economical-I fully understand the

    Read More »from Settle an Argument: To Hoard or Not to Hoard?
  • By Charlotte Hilton Andersen, REDBOOK

    Are your kids spoiled or entitled this holiday season? If you'd have asked me last week, I would have answered no. That was before my 4th grader handed me a three-page Christmas wish list. Front and back. When I asked him to circle his top three favorites, he gave me a look that can only be described as Kardashian-esque and replied tartly, "Consider them all circled."

    Handing the papers back to him, I smiled. "At least you got lots of good handwriting practice out of this!" To which my husband added dryly, "And that's all you're going to be getting out of this."

    My husband and I work really hard year-round to instill gratitude and a spirit of service in our four children, but it seems like every year the holiday season conspires against us. Our best intentions are beat down by toy catalogs and school friends. I felt relieved when a Parenting.com survey showed that 76 percent of moms feel like their kids get spoiled during this

    Read More »from 'Tis the Season for Spoiled and Entitled Kids (And the Surprising Way to Undo the Damage)
  • Three Totally Hot Holiday Presents for Couples to Exchange

    By Joslyn Gray, REDBOOK

    My Darling Husband,

    Christmas is just around the corner, and since you normally wait 'til 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve to do your shopping, I figure it's still okay for me to give you some gift ideas. With funds being as tight as they are right now, we probably don't need to go crazy buying stuff we don't need.

    Here are a few ideas I had:

    Take the children somewhere. Anywhere. Just out of this house. The last time I had ten minutes to myself in our house, Madonna still had a New York accent. Ideally you will take them beyond our backyard, because I can still hear them screaming out there, and when one of the kids inevitably scrapes a knee I will end up dealing with it. I will even help you get the children ready to go outside. However, if any of them need to pee right after we get them bundled up, it's on you.

    If you do this for me, I will totally take the kids somewhere for an entire Sunday afternoon of football so you can watch the games

    Read More »from Three Totally Hot Holiday Presents for Couples to Exchange
  • 4 Health Resolutions You Can Make

    By Natalie Gingerich Mackenzie, REDBOOK

    Forget grand, sweeping promises that quickly flame out (starting today, no more cookies-ever!). It's time to focus on one simple health change you can stick with, like these readers. Here's help.

    1. I Want To... Quit Sipping Diet Soda

    "My mom has osteoporosis, and her doctor told her to give up soft drinks because they may weaken bones. I have a daily diet soda habit, and want to avoid the same fate." -ANN W., 28, OKLAHOMA CITY

    Your game plan: First, relax. No cold turkey! Ramping down gradually is the best way to quit any dietary habit, says dietitian Keri Gans, R.D. Start by subbing a different brand for your usual fix. Why? "You won't love it quite as much, making it easier to cut down," Gans says. After a few days, stop at half a can per day. After another week, go to every other day for a while. At that point, your habit has been thoroughly interrupted and you can drop the stuff completely or switch to sparkling water with

    Read More »from 4 Health Resolutions You Can Make
  • Murphy's 8 Laws of Children

    By Charlotte Hilton Andersen, REDBOOK

    Sometimes referred to as "the law of low expectations" I think Murphy's law was invented for kids. After all, "if it can go wrong, it will go wrong" pretty much defines the last 10 years of my life. I jest, but only a little. Here is how Murphy's law works in my house:

    1. The Law of the Grocery Cart: When your child is a toddler they will thrash and scream to get out of the cart, but you can't let them or it'll be a Code Adam in about two minutes. But then as soon as they're in grade school and capable of walking responsibly, all they'll do is hang all over the cart.

    2. The Law of the White Suit/Dress: Just like you are guaranteed to get your period the day you put on your new white linen pants, the second that little white dress makes an appearance, someone will hand your kid grape Fanta.

    Related: 100+ Gifts Under $50

    3. The Law of the Diaper Blowout: The noise your infant's bowel movements produce is inversely

    Read More »from Murphy's 8 Laws of Children
  • By Charlotte Hilton Andersen, REDBOOK

    children's concert
    'Tis the season to be jolly! 'Tis also the season to hear your kid sing this song over and over and over again in preparation for the inevitable winter holiday choir concert. In theory the idea of watching be-robed tots fill the air with their angelic voices sounds delightful. In practice it's about as close the boy Vienna Boys Choir as Kris Humphries was to being a Kardashian. Which is to say that if you squint you probably won't notice anything amiss, until they open their mouths.

    Everything about an elementary school concert is unpredictable from the time it's scheduled (4:48 p.m.?) to the number of chairs in the lunchroom/stage to the performance itself. There are songs, dance numbers (often impromptu), waves to mom and dad, recorder solos, yells to mom and dad, and recitations.

    Yet all of the hoopla is worth it when you see your shiny faced first grader belting out "Jeremiah was a bull frog" and waving his hand-made Santa hat. (Note: I Read More »from Great Mom Debate: Is it Rude to Leave Your Child's Concert After Their Part is Done?
  • Christmas Gifts on a Budget: Want, Need, Wear, Read

    By Carmen Staicer, REDBOOK

    Quite simply, my children have too much stuff. Which means that they are exactly like the vast majority of American children today-and in fact, most all of us.

    I've been working very diligently throughout the year to teach my family that they don't need so many things, but it doesn't seem to be settling into their brains. I wondered if I could pinpoint where much of the "stuff" came from-thinking back through the last gift-giving occasions-and landing on Christmas. It was then that I realized that most of the consumerism came from me.

    In purchasing gifts, I wanted to be fair. No one wants to play, "Who does Mom love best?," and absolutely no one wants any of their children to feel left out-so, I tried to balance it, as best I could. In this endeavor, though, I realized I'd gone overboard, buying items that were extraneous and often virtually ignored. I wondered: What could I do to change this?

    Related: 7 Ways to Improve Your Fashion

    Read More »from Christmas Gifts on a Budget: Want, Need, Wear, Read

Pagination

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