Blog Posts by Vitamin G, Glamour Magazine

  • What Your Waist Says About Your Health

    Sarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    Let's set our feelings about looking great in a bikini aside for a sec, and simply talk about health. Have you ever measured the circumference of your waist? Interestingly, it may tell you some fascinating things about your health...

    See more: 19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    Experts have long cautioned that body mass index (BMI) measurements may not be the best way to gauge health, especially given the fact that we're all built differently. What's more important, though, according to a team of researchers from Tufts University, is what's going on with our waists!

    See more: 7 Signs of True Love

    In a review of 31 studies and articles on the subject of BMI, experts now report that a much better measure of health is to measure your waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio, to predict risk for conditions like high blood pressure, type-2 diabetes, high body fat levels and metabolic syndrome. In case you're wondering,

    Read More »from What Your Waist Says About Your Health
  • "Social Jet Lag" is Making You Fat

    Lexi Petronis, Glamour magazine

    You know how when you fly from, say, Athens to New York City, you're sleepy, out of it, and just generally weird for a few days until your body and brain adjust to your new time zone? (Not that I've ever experienced that exact flight pattern. Yet.) Well, research is showing that you could be putting yourself through something similar every single week--and it may be affecting your weight.

    See more: 19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    If your sleep schedule changes between weekends and weekdays, researchers from the University of Munich's Institute of Medical Psychology say you could be experiencing "social jet lag": the difference between your body's own natural time clock (which it likes to stick to on weekends, when you can sleep in) and the prescribed clock to which you're forced to adhere (setting the alarm to get up early enough to make it to work or class on time).

    The result? Your body basically goes back and forth between two

    Read More »from "Social Jet Lag" is Making You Fat
  • The Health Benefit of Chewing Slowly

    Sarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    Are you a fast eater? I'm guilty, and I blame my crazy-busy schedule. But, there's an important new reason for me, and you, to chew a little slower and savor our food longer...

    See more: 7 Signs of True Love

    Healthy experts have long warned that fast eating can lead to weight gain, but what you might not realize is that wolfing down your food can also lead to another health consequence: I higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes. Eeks!

    Lithuanian researcher found that speedy eaters were two and a half times more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than those who eat at a more snail-like pace.

    See more:
    19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    The researchers aren't sure exactly why this is the case, but it's worth remembering next time you're sitting down to a meal. (And, interestingly, consider sipping on coffee with your meal: The same team found that drinking two cups of coffee per day also slashed the risk for diabetes!)

    Read More »from The Health Benefit of Chewing Slowly
  • Should You Drink Aloe Juice?

    Sarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    You slather it on your skin when you get a sunburn, but should you drink the stuff? Some say yes. Here's why...

    See more: 7 Signs of True Love

    FitSugar
    recently examined an interesting health trend: aloe juice--as a beverage. I was interested, because I spotted a woman at the grocery store with a jug of the stuff in her cart, and she told the checker that she drinks it every morning. Hmm. According to FitSugar, aloe is pretty good for you (but beware of the yucky taste--it's apparently pretty pungent). Some of the supposed health benefits:

    Digestive health: It may help regulate and calm digestion by encouraging bowl movements and helping stop diarrhea.

    See more: 19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    Immune system boost: It may stimulate white blood cell production, which can help your body fight viruses.

    Pain reliever and reduces inflammation: Great for athletes, aloe vera juice may also improve joint flexibility and reduce inflammation.

    Read More »from Should You Drink Aloe Juice?
  • Are Spanx Bad for You?

    Photo courtesy of spanx.comPhoto courtesy of spanx.comSarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    You love your Spanx, of course, as do I! But, one health expert is coming forward to point the finger at our favorite slimming undergarment, saying that shapers are bad for our health. Let's discuss.

    Should Spanx, and all shapers, be vilified? Well, one health expert in the UK says they should come with a health warning. These form-fitting undergarments, he says, can cause incontinence, heartburn, even panic attacks.

    See more: Spring 2012's Most Wearable Fashion Trends

    "Control underwear is the 21st-century version of the corset, with all the same health risks," said Richard Bricknell, director at the Bristol Physiotherapy Clinic in England, in an article in The Daily Mail. The article goes on to say: "The increased pressure on your lower stomach can force acid up to the gullet, leading to heartburn. Over time, this could contribute to inflammation, ulcers and, in extreme cases, oesophageal cancer."

    See more: 7 Signs of True Love

    Read More »from Are Spanx Bad for You?
  • The 4 Best Craving-Killing Foods

    CN Digital StudioSarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    Say you have a ravenous craving for chips, cupcakes, fries, or any other food that you know you may eat too much of. Eat one of these foods instead...

    See more: Spring 2012's Most Wearable Fashion Trends

    Killer cravings can come on fast and strong: All of a sudden, you're sitting at your desk and you feel as if you might kill for a vanilla cupcake with buttercream frosting. What to do? Eat one of these foods, reports MSNBC's Danielle Braff:

    1. Sunflower seeds: They're packed with nutrients, and snacking on a handful may regulate your nerves and muscles. Serving size: 1/4-cup

    See more: 7 Signs of True Love

    2. Plain frozen yogurt with fresh fruit: It has less fat than ice cream but five grams of filling protein per serving. Fruit gives it more flavor, texture, and vitamins. Serving size: 1 1/2 cups

    3. Dark chocolate: Just a small portion of this antioxidant-filled treat satisfies a sweet tooth.
    Serving size: 1 oz dark

    Read More »from The 4 Best Craving-Killing Foods
  • How to Handle Hormonal Food Cravings

    Lexi Petronis, Glamour magazine

    Once a month, my appetite feels kind of like Kim Kardashian's ability to get press--it's uncontainable. I'm not kidding: during those few days, if a food is not nailed to the table or superglued shut, I will probably eat it. Any chance you're like that, too?

    See more: Spring 2012's Most Wearable Fashion Trends

    Obviously, everyone's menstrual cycle is different. Some of us have serious cravings during PMS; others experience them during our actual periods; and others have no cravings at all, ever. And, of course, we crave things that are as different as crackers and cake. Hormones are funny little guys.

    But there are a few tricks to smoothing out the process and keep the period cravings in check:

    See more: 7 Signs of True Love

    1: According to one study, the chocolate cravings really are a thing. In order to level out your blood sugar--and your cravings for cocoa--eat fiber-rich, whole grain breads and cereals.

    2: Eat some

    Read More »from How to Handle Hormonal Food Cravings
  • Cancer-Fighting Veggies

    Sarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    I know, it's hard to get excited about veggies, but wait: This type of vegetables may have the power to fight off certain cancers and help extend your life.

    See more: Spring 2012's Most Wearable Fashion Trends

    The cancer-fighting veggie? Broccoli! And kale and cabbage and other leafy greens.

    U.S. researchers
    reviewed data from breast cancer survivors in China, and found that when women ate cruciferous vegetables daily (that would be broccoli and other leafy greens), they were 27 percent less likely to die after a breast cancer diagnosis than women who reported not eating many servings of this type of veggie.

    See more:
    19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    Gals, this is convincing and compelling. If you aren't eating your cruciferous veggies, time to eat up!


    More from Glamour:

    10 Things He's Thinking When You're Naked
    18 Midlength Hairstyles to Consider
    5 Quick Fixes for Anything That Jiggles
    What Your Hair Says About

    Read More »from Cancer-Fighting Veggies
  • The Scary Health Risk for Tall Women

    CN Digital StudioSarah Jio, Glamour magazine

    Are you tall? Experts say it could mean this surprising thing for your health...

    See more:
    Spring 2012's Most Wearable Fashion Trends

    An Oxford University study of more than 100,000 women found that for every extra two inches of height, your risk for ovarian cancer increases by 7 percent. Experts aren't sure why this is the case, but it's a good reminder to be screened for ovarian cancer and chat with your doctor about your risk factors if you're tall. (And, check out what researchers say about women's height and their happiness!)

    See more:
    19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    Does ovarian cancer run in your family? Are your family members tall?


    P.S. Could oral sex cause cancer? And, this brave woman survived breast cancer--twice!


    More from Glamour:

    10 Things He's Thinking When You're Naked
    18 Midlength Hairstyles to Consider
    5 Quick Fixes for Anything That Jiggles
    What Your Hair Says About You (According to

    Read More »from The Scary Health Risk for Tall Women
  • New Mood News About Fast Food

    Lexi Petronus, Glamour magazine

    While it may be quick--and, yes, sometimes deceptively tasty--fast food doesn't have a whole lot of checks in the "healthy" column. But you knew that. What you might not know is that it could play a role in your mental state.

    According to new research
    by scientists from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and the University of Granada, there may be a correlation between how much fast food you eat and how depressed you are.

    See more: 19 Cute Celebrity Hairstyles to Consider

    The study found that participants who regularly ate fast food (pizza, burgers, fries) and commercially-produced baked goods (croissants, doughnuts, muffins) were 51 percent more likely to develop depression. (All 8,964 people in the study were not depressed when the research began.) The researchers also found that fast-food eaters were more likely to be more sedentary, smoke, eat other unhealthy foods, and work 45 or more hours a week.

    See more: 7 Signs of

    Read More »from New Mood News About Fast Food

Pagination

(841 Stories)