Blog Posts by The Editors of Runner's World

  • 6 Diet Rules that Boost Fitness Results

    Keep it simple, keep it balanced--and keep it hydrated Keep it simple, keep it balanced--and keep it hydrated Keep it simple, keep it balanced--and keep it hydrated
    By Pamela Nisevich Bede, M.S., R.D., Runner's World


    Hopefully, with March right around the corner, you've been sticking to your New Year's fitness resolutions (if you haven't been consistent, revisit the plan with these 6 Ways to Stick to Your Weight Loss Goals). When you start exercising regularly, you might have to revamp some of your everyday eating habits in order to feel your best while you're working out and avoid unwanted bathroom stops. Here are some general rules that will boost your workout and help you start seeing results on the scale.

    PLUS: The Best Diet For Beginners

    1. Go on empty (sometimes). What you eat before you hit the road or the gym all depends on when you're exercising and what kind of workout you're planning. Many people don't have the time-or the stomach-to eat and digest food before a workout, especially if that workout is taking place in the early morning. For an easy workout of one hour or

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  • Top 3 Food Ingredients that Hurt Your Heart

    Here's what to take out of your pantry-and what to stock-to keep your ticker going strong for years to come.Here's what to take out of your pantry-and what to stock-to keep your ticker going strong for years to come.Here's what to take out of your pantry--and what to stock--to keep your ticker going strong for years to come.
    By Pamela Nisevich Bede, M.S., R.D., Runner's World

    In the game of life, there are already so many sacrifices one is forced to make. This is especially true for anyone wanting to shed pounds or eat healthier. Perhaps that's why I've often heard myself telling clients, complete strangers, and myself that every food can fit into a healthy diet. But in reality, there are some foods that really should not cross our lips. This week, as we focus on love and--in my mind--heart health, here's a list of foods that should be making their way out of your pantry. Not to worry, in order to stay on the positive side and not be penned as the "food police," I've included a list of heart-healthy foods that should be making their way into your heart.

    PLUS: 9 Heart-Healthy Foods You Need More Of

    Saturated Fat
    Sure, we all know that we really need to cut back on artery-clogging

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  • 8 Ways to Reverse the Weight Loss Mistakes You’re Making

    Avoid these common mistakes that can sabotage your efforts to drop a few poundsAvoid these common mistakes that can sabotage your efforts to drop a few poundsBy Denise Schipani, Runner's World

    POP QUIZ: You just went for a run. How many calories did you blast? Chances are your guess outpaces reality, to the tune of, say, a Frappuccino. Overestimating calorie burn is the Big Daddy of runners' weight-loss mistakes, says Lisa Ellis, M.S., R.D., a nutritionist in Westchester, New York. But it's not the only misstep. Sneaky slipups can derail the weight-loss efforts of even health-savvy runners. Here's how to avoid eight common mistakes. (While you're at it, learn the top nutrition myths to avoid, too.)

    1. OOPS! Miscounting Calories
    It's true that running eats up more calories than nearly any other activity: The average man burns 124 calories per mile and the average woman burns 105, which means a three-miler nets you a 315- to 372-calorie deficit. But you can easily overspend your calorie deficit with something as simple as a flavored latte and a chocolate-chip cookie.

    Reverse It
    Get a better estimate of your calorie burn with an

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  • 7 Health Tests Your Workout Messes With

    How the miles you log can affect medical tests.

    By Cindy Kuzma, Runner's World

    If there's one time to brag about being a runner or staying active, it's at the doctor's office--especially when your appointment includes blood or urine analyses. "Let your physician know if you are exercising heavily, and also how often and how recently you did tough workouts; it can influence how we interpret tests," says William Roberts, M.D., a family physician and medical director for the Twin Cities Marathon. If you recently ran hard--or even ran to your appointment, which Dr. Roberts's patients have been known to do--your doc might elect to reschedule some lab work. Here's a quick report of some exercise-influenced workups.

    PLUS: The 5 Health Tests You Need to Ace This Year

    CREATINE KINASE (CK)
    Tells your doc: Whether you've had a heart attack or other type of muscle breakdown; often done if you've experienced unexplained muscle pain or weakness or chest pain or tightness

    Running's effects
    :

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  • 3 Ways to Train During a Polar Vortex

    Struggling to stick to your training plan this winter? Here's what to do when the weather takes a turn for the Arctic. Struggling to stick to your training plan this winter? Here's what to do when the weather takes a turn for the Arctic. By Jenny Hadfield, Runner's World

    One of the great things about training through an Arctic winter is that you'll remember this season forever and have training stories to brag about for life! That said, when Alaskan weather strikes, here's how to effectively train through it.

    PLUS: If you must go for a run outdoors, check out these fast and effective workout tips designed for cold weather.

    Hit the treadmill.
    I've written about Alaska-based elite runner Chris Clark, who prepared for the 2000 Olympic Marathon Trials on a treadmill to acclimate to the heat and avoid the snow-ridden roads.

    There is a tipping point at which running outdoors becomes less effective and more risky, and when you have the double whammy of Arctic temperatures and ice and snow, it's time to take your workouts inside to weather the storm. Not only is it wise to make the move inside to prevent injuries, it can also aid in more efficient recovery, as training in extreme elements takes a lot more out of

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  • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Dieters

    Simple habits of a healthy life.Simple habits of a healthy life.By the Editors of Runner's World

    People who work out consistently (and stick to it) and people who lose pounds (and keep them off) have habits in common. Here they are:

    1. Create a support network.

    Make friends to meet for workouts, share victories with, and comfort through setbacks and bad races. A like-minded peer group is a powerful motivating force. Get your spouse, your children, and your friends on board with your running and weight-loss efforts. They'll give you kudos for your efforts, and they'll be less likely to sabotage your healthy eating efforts. Surround yourself with people pursuing similar goals. If possible, recruit a training partner. You'll never skip a workout if you know you're leaving a friend waiting for you at the park. Here's how to choose the best workout partner for your fitness goals.

    2. Set goals.

    Get specific about your goals--the races you want to run, the times you want to hit, the miles you want to cover by the end of the year. Set goals

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  • 25 Snacks that Boost Weight Loss Results

    Sports nutritionists recommend the best between-meal noshes Sports nutritionists recommend the best between-meal noshes By the editors of Runner's World

    Do you need a midnight, mid-afternoon, or mid-run snack to get through the day?

    We know we do. Let's face it: three square meals are no match for your appetite. The good news is that eating small meals throughout the day not only silences your grumbling stomach, but can also aid in weight loss. From soybeans to gummy bears (yes, really!), we've got 25 workout-friendly foods that can be eaten (in snack size) whenever hunger comes knocking.

    PLUS: The Best Weight Loss Foods of All Time

    1. Bananas
    Why they're good:
    Bananas are chock full of good carbohydrates. They are a good source of vitamin B6 and are vital for managing protein metabolism. (Runners need more protein during and after workouts.)

    When they're good: Before, during, or after exercise. They're great blended into a fruit smoothie. Or simply whip frozen banana chunks with milk in a blender for an awesome recovery shake.

    Calories:
    105 per medium-sized banana.

    2. Carrots

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  • 5 Ways Running Makes You Smarter

    Running may be great for weight loss and overall fitness, but it might be good for more than just your physique. Find out how running actually boosts your brain, too.

    1. Running helps your brain grow.

    Don't worry--we're not talking bursting-through-your-skull growth. Running stimulates the creation of new nerve cells and blood vessels within the brain, an organ that tends to shrink as a person ages. Also, studies have shown that running may help increase the volume of the midbrain (which controls vision and hearing) and the hippocampus (which is linked to memory and learning). Find out just how long you need to run to power your noggin in, How Much Exercise is Best For Mental Health?

    2. Running helps your brain age better.
    In addition to preventing or reversing age-related shrinkage, running affects brain chemicals in a way that sets runners up to have healthier-than-average brains later in life. A study last year measured neural markers and cognitive function in middle-aged

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  • The Daily Roadblocks in Your Weight Loss Battle

    It's never going to be easy, but here's how to get back up and win the battle against extra pounds.It's never going to be easy, but here's how to get back up and win the battle against extra pounds.By Pamela Nisevich Bede, M.S., R.D., Runner's World

    Like most things in life, the treadmill at work carries a slogan. It reminds users that "Every day is a challenge," and we need to prepare mentally and physically for the daily challenges set before us.

    But as I look around while running in place, I realize that most treadmill users probably aren't in training for the challenge of a marathon or working toward a new PR. No, most are driven into motion with two simple goals: improve health and lose weight. And if you too are starting off the year with the goal of finally (!) losing an incredible amount of weight or finally (!) losing those last few stubborn pounds, then you know that the treadmill slogan is all wrong. Every day is not a challenge. Every day is a fight.

    (TRY THIS: Our 5-Step Run-to-Lose Plan is simple, pain-free, and won't make your weight loss battle harder than it has to be.)

    It's a fight with the coffee barista who asks if you want extra whip or cream and sugar.

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  • “I Lost 125 Pounds by Running!”

    Evan, after his 125 lb. weight loss.Evan, after his 125 lb. weight loss.NAME: Evan Bass
    AGE: 44
    OCCUPATION: Editor/Writer
    HOMETOWN: Sterling, Virginia
    FAMILY: My significant other, Valerie

    What prompted you to start working out?

    One day I noticed that the newspaper obituaries were full of faces with big double chins like mine. I wondered about them. They were people who were looking forward to years of laughing, crying, celebrating, learning, loving…living. Having been morbidly obese for 15 years, my time to die was coming. I was 40 years old in October 2009, and on a day I felt "good" about myself, the scale still said I was 285 pounds (at 5-foot-7). I never weighed myself in "bad" periods, but I'm sure I must have exceeded 300. I resolved to try again to bring my weight down in winter 2009.

    MORE: Follow us during Weight Loss Week, where our experts offer tips guaranteed to jump-start your 2014 goals!

    How did you start?

    I applied common sense about portion control, vegetables, and avoiding typical junk food. And I tried a coed fitness boot camp

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