Blog Posts by Dory Devlin, Shine staff

  • Reinvention story: Melanie Feehan

    Check out Melanie Feehan of The Coupon Goddess tell her reinvention story at the Yahoo! Shine You. Reinvented. booth at BlogHer '10.

  • Reinvention story: Megan Capone

    Check out Megan Capone of AGirlMustShop.com tell her reinvention story at the Yahoo! Shine You. Reinvented. booth at BlogHer '10.

  • Reinvention story: Stacy DeBroff

    Check out Stacy DeBroff of momcentral.com tell her reinvention story at the Yahoo! Shine You. Reinvented. booth at BlogHer '10.

  • It's official: Obesity is a "major public health threat"

    You'd think it couldn't get any worse, then it does. I'm talking about the size of the American people. It's no wonder that first lady Michele Obama has made fighting obesity the cause of her time in the White House. Maybe we can save the next generation because this adult one is getting bigger by the year.

    Today's news: A solid one in four Americans is considered obese, and in nine states, 30 percent of the population is obese. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the increase is enough to make obesity an epidemic and "a major public health threat." Not surprising, when you consider that in 2007, three states claimed 30 percent of its residents to be obese, and in 2000, no states hit the 30-percent threshold.

    We are moving in the wrong direction.

    Here's a closer look at some of the frightening numbers:

    • There are more obese adults in the South (28.4 percent) and the Midwest (28.2 percent) than in the Northeast and the West (both 24 percent).
    • Mississippi has the
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  • Have the talk with your kids ... about plagiarism and the web

    The New York TimesThe New York TimesConcern over the fact that students are grabbing whole sentences and paragraphs of words off of the Internet and not attributing them to original sources or authors is not new. But every once in a while we take note of the growing ignorance of (or comfort with) plagiarism in the digital age, and it's alarming.

    The New York Times reports that despite all of the plagiarism alarms sounded, it is getting less not more clear to students what is stealing and what isn't when it comes to the written word on the web. A Rutgers University business professor and co-founder of the Center for Academic Integrity, Donald L. McCabe, surveyed 14,000 students from 2006 to 2010 and found that 40 percent of undergraduates admit to copying at least a few sentences in written school assignments. But the scarier finding is that the number of students who believe copying from the Internet to be considered "serious cheating" is going down -- 29 percent consider it serious business in recent surveys compared

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  • Do your politics affect where you shop?

    AP Photo/Craig Lassig: Protestors in front of a Minnesota Target following the company's contribution to a GOP candidate who opposes gay marriage.AP Photo/Craig Lassig: Protestors in front of a Minnesota Target following the company's contribution to a GOP candidate who opposes gay marriage.When Randi Reitan heard about Target's $150,000 donation to a Minnesota-based political group backing a gubernatorial candidate who opposes gay rights, she immediately went to the Target where she regularly shops, told the manager she could no longer spend money there in good conscious, and cut up her Target Visa card.

    Reitan has been a strong supporter of gay marriage and other rights for gay people ever since her son came out 10 years ago, according to this ABC News piece.. Much as she may have loved roaming the well-coordinated, colorful aisles of the superstore, the news of the company's political contribution has changed where she will shop.

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this year that private companies can make donations to political campaigns, overturning portions of a 63-year-old law. The ruling gives Target and other retailers the right to channel money into campaigns, but they clearly risk upsetting at least one group of voters every time a big contribution like this comes

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  • Beware: Sitting too much may shorten your life

    When you sit at a computer for more hours than you care to admit every day, this is the kind of headline that will stop you dead in your sedentary tracks:

    "Study: The longer you sit, the shorter your life."

    The study of 123,216 people (nearly 70,000 women, and 53,000 men) is one of the first to study the direct link between sitting a lot to mortality, though several studies have found links between sitting time and obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, USA Today reports. The study participants were followed for 14 years--1993 to 2006.

    It's all very troubling for people who sit a good bit of the workday. Here's why: Even after adjusting for risk factors including body mass index (BMI) and smoking, women who spend six hours a day sitting had a 37 percent higher risk of dying compared to those who spend less than three hours in a chair. For men, the risk was 17 percent higher.

    Exercise, even a little a day, lowered the mortality risk linked to sitting, though not by a lot. An

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  • POLL: How and where do you spend your time online?

    ThinkstockThinkstockYahoo! recently took a deep look into women spend time online and what we get out of the experience when we do, and the results are pretty fascinating.

    It turns out that whether women are married or single, younger or older, working or work-at-home, we tend to be looking for the same things and experiences online no matter where we fall in the demographic categories that neatly and incompletely describe who we are.

    At varying times, we are looking to connect with close friends, share information with personal and work acquaintances, get trusted opinions about plans we are making, products we may buy, movies we just may get a free night to go out to see. Other times, we are looking to anonymously share emotional issues, get answers to serious personal questions, or to take a few minutes to escape from our everyday, demanding routines by reading favorite blogs or playing online games.

    On sites like Shine, women can do just about all of the above. What's interesting is women reported

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  • Poll: What is your employment story during this "jobless" recovery?

    Thinkstock: Unemployment insurance extension approved by Congress.Thinkstock: Unemployment insurance extension approved by Congress.Unemployment benefits will be extended for long-term unemployed Americans after months of Republican opposition, which abated only after Democrats agreed not to include COBRA health insurance extensions in the package.

    Welcome news for the millions of long-term unemployed Americans affected, but it's hard to let out a huge sigh of relief in the face of the latest jobs reports, which sadly corroborate that if we are truly in the midst of a recovery, it remains a jobless one. Employers are hesitant to hire, and unemployment stints are dragging on.

    The number of unemployed workers, 14.6 million, moved down in June, but weekly reports since then indicate an upward trend in job loss. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke this week predicted that the unemployment rate would gradually decline to somewhere between 9.2 percent and 9.5 percent by the end of 2010, but at a slower rate than the Fed had forecast in the spring.

    Basically, the unemployment market is as stuck as the housing market.

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  • So, that's it for Roman Polanski?

    AP Photo/Michel Euler (File): Roman Polanski, who will not be extradited to the United States.AP Photo/Michel Euler (File): Roman Polanski, who will not be extradited to the United States.Roman Polanski's victim is reportedly satisfied with the Swiss government's decision to not extradite the famed film director to the United States to face charges for a 1977 crime no one disputes he committed. Tempting as it is to want to take her lead and say what's done is done, it's not easy to do.

    At the age of 43, Polanski drugged and raped a 13-year-old girl. He can call it sex (Polanski pleaded guilty to having sex with the girl, 13 at the time, after giving her champagne and drugs), and she can say she wants to put it behind her, but he has evaded being held accountable for any measure of his crime. Sex with a minor is a crime.

    So, Polanski is a free man, unable to come to the United States, but a free man. A Swiss justice minister said the decision was made after the U.S. Justice Department failed to provide records of a hearing in which the Oscar-winning director claimed his case had been settled and the sentence agreed upon. The long-time director was at first charged with

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Pagination

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