Blog Posts by Saveur

  • Decorating with White Chocolate

    ​While working on this month's story about white chocolate ("Beyond the Pale,") we called in more than 100 pounds of the buttery confection to make bread puddings, panna cottas, cookies, and mousse. Given its silky texture and the way its pale hue lends itself to decoration, we were excited to work with it-until we discovered that it's almost impossible to pipe through a pastry bag. That can be a problem if you're trying to cement a gingerbread house, or top that house off with a "snow"-covered roof. Unlike regular chocolate, which holds its shape after heating, white chocolate, with its high percentage of slippery cocoa butter, turns runny.

    RELATED: Christmas Cookies »

    Hoping to find a way to pipe it, we paid a visit to Jacques Torres' chocolate factory in Manhattan. The key to decorating with white chocolate, Torres told us, is to sprinkle in water before pouring it from pan to pastry bag. So long as you're working with real white chocolate, with at least 20 percent cocoa

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  • A German Christmas Dinner

    This holiday, celebrate with a cozy dinner of warming German classics, including hearty braised pork roast with root vegetables and irresistible Christmas cookies.



    THE MENU


    PLANNING TIPS
    1. For a festive, fruity cocktail, stir this traditional sweet-tart macerated fruit conserve into some champagne.

    2. Potato pancakes are traditionally served with applesauce, a sweet compliment to the savory, crispy fried potatoes. Try serving the pancakes with our apple cranberry sauce for extra tang.

    3. When serving the baked walnut-stuffed apples, try experimenting with flavored whipped creams, which are super easy to prepare and add sophisticated flavor.


    RELATED: Perfect Eggnog Recipes



    Todd Coleman RECIPE: Read More »from A German Christmas Dinner
  • Menu: A German Christmas Dinner

    This holiday, celebrate with a cozy dinner of warming German classics, including hearty braised pork roast with root vegetables and irresistible Christmas cookies.



    THE MENU


    PLANNING TIPS
    1. For a festive, fruity cocktail, stir this traditional sweet-tart macerated fruit conserve into some champagne.

    2. Potato pancakes are traditionally served with applesauce, a sweet compliment to the savory, crispy fried potatoes. Try serving the pancakes with our apple cranberry sauce for extra tang.

    3. When serving the baked walnut-stuffed apples, try experimenting with flavored whipped creams, which are super easy to prepare and add

    Read More »from Menu: A German Christmas Dinner
  • Handmade Holiday Gifts

    During my childhood, my parents had a friend who gave the most incredible holiday treat bags each year. She always included frosted sugar cookies, homemade caramels, chocolate candies and giant bags of deeply roasted Chex Mix. We looked forward to Eleanor's delivery every year. Since I reached adulthood, I've tried to establish a similar tradition of edible gifts for my family and close friends. Though the list changes each year, the recipes that follow are some of my current favorites for holiday giving.
    -Marisa McClellan, author of Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round

    Mulled Apple Cider Concentrate
    Mulled Apple Cider Concentrate

    This cider concentrate makes your kitchen smell divine. It's good drizzled over pancakes, added to homemade vinaigrettes or used as a ham glaze. For a quick, warming drink, spoon three tablespoons into a large mug and fill with just-boiled water.

    See the recipe for Mulled Apple Cider Concentrate »




    Candied Clementines
    Candied Clementines

    After simmering clementines in

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  • Menu: A Classic French Dinner

    For a cold winter night, gather your friends together to linger over an elegant meal of buttery-rich, timeless French classics.



    THE MENU


    PLANNING TIPS
    1. The veal, paté, scallops, and chocolate mousse are all featured in our 150th issue. For more classic recipes from the issue, see the gallery.

    2. For sustainably raised and butchered veal, as well as other high-end meats, see our "Guiltless Luxury" round-up.

    3. To make the chocolate shavings for the mousse, hold a block of chocolate and pass a vegetable peeler over the narrowest edge.

    4. Pair the veal with a well-balanced Bordeaux white; we recommend the light, refreshingly acidic 2006 Chateau de Fieuzal, which

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  • A Spanish Tapas Dinner Party


    Tapas have a long history. One story is that the 13th-century Castilian king Alfonso X El Sabio (the Learned) was instructed by his doctor to eat several mini-meals a day with wine; hence, tapas. Cervantes, in his 17th-century classic Don Quijote, refers to llamativos, or ''lures''-tidbits designed to arouse hunger or thirst. However, the most commonly accepted theory is that tapas as we know them originated in Andalusia in the 19th century as small saucers set over wineglasses in taverns to keep the aroma in and the flies out. Eventually, lore has it, some savvy soul hit upon the idea that complimentary morsels of food placed upon the saucers would increase bar sales. It worked: Today, tapas are rarely free-but there are more than a thousand varieties of them, and every region, city, and bar in Spain has its own specialties, from baked scallops in Galicia to stuffed peppers in San Sebastián to Casa Bigote's cod.

    RELATED: Saveur's Essential Spain »

    A giant soirée and movable feast to which everyone is invited, the tapeo-or tapas-bar spree-invents itself as it goes along: conversations with strangers, spontaneous introductions, the unexpected appearance of an old friend or ex-lover...Anything can happen on a tapeo, and often does. The tapeo reflects the Spanish approach to life-this itinerant tasting and tippling stems from an unabashed love of play and pleasure.

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  • MENU: Family Style Taco Dinner

    We're fixing up a crowd-pleasing, family-style meal of grilled fish tacos with flour tortillas and creamy chipotle sauce served with rice and beans.

    RELATED: 150 Classic Recipes Every Great Cook Should Know »

    RECIPE: Grilled Fish Tacos with Creamy Chipotle Sauce
    SERVES 8

    INGREDIENTS
    FOR THE CHIPOTLE SAUCE:
    ½ cup mayonnaise
    ⅓ cup plain Greek yogurt
    ½ tsp. dried oregano
    ¼ tsp. ground cumin
    ¼ tsp. dried dill
    1 canned chipotle chile in adobo sauce plus 1 tsp. sauce
    Kosher salt, to taste

    RELATED: Warming Chili Recipes »

    FOR THE FISH:
    1 tsp. garlic powder
    1 tsp. paprika
    ½ tsp. cayenne
    ½ tsp. ground cumin
    ½ tsp. dried oregano
    2½ lb. boneless, skinless tilapia fillets, sliced in half lengthwise
    Kosher salt, to taste
    Canola oil, for grilling

    TO SERVE:
    8" corn or flour tortillas, warmed
    ¼ small head green cabbage, very thinly shredded
    1 small white onion, minced
    1 medium tomato, cored and finely chopped
    2 limes, cut into wedges

    RELATED: 10 Simple Fall Dinners »

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  • The Best Sweet Potato Casserole

    ​Truth be told, I used to shudder at the sight of the sweet potato casserole that appeared on our table each Thanksgiving. It was made with canned "candied yams," which were mushy and syrupy-sweet (sorry, Mom), and blanketed in an airtight layer of mini marshmallows. But I love sweet potatoes; I love marshmallows. Couldn't the two work well together somehow? I figured a little research might help me find a way. The sweet potato casserole I now make synthesizes elements from various stages in the dish's evolution. Taking a cue from Southern cooks who top their casserole with pecans, I top mine with a pecan crumble made with oats, flour, butter, brown sugar, and salt, which provides the right sweet-savory crunch. That would be delicious enough, but to me it's just not complete without marshmallows: They're such a nice, airy counterpoint to the rich and earthy potatoes. I use them sparingly, as they were in the original recipe from 1917, which allows a large surface area of each

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  • Roast the Perfect Turkey

    By Molly Stevens. Originally appeared in SAVEUR magazine.

    There are a ton of ways to do turkey for the holidays. I've brined it, smoked it, fried it, dry-rubbed it; but eventually I (and everyone else around the table) tired of elaborate seasonings and complicated preparations. What we really craved was just a fantastic roast turkey-and this recipe produces exactly that. Follow these steps and you'll have tender legs, juicy white meat, burnished skin, and lots of gravy. In fact, it's the single best technique for roasting a bird that I know and the only one I use anymore when it comes to this special meal.

    Related: Italian American Christmas Cookies »

    To start, I shop for a fresh, humanely raised bird, ideally not more than 15 pounds; the gargantuan, industrially raised fowl sold by the truckload around the holidays are bland (at best) and, because they're so big, impossible to cook evenly. One 13- to 14-pound fresh turkey will generously feed 10 to 12 people (for more guests,

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  • Tips We're Thankful For

    Here are our best tips for Thanksgiving cooking, including how to achieve a crispier-skinned bird, fluffier pumpkin pie, and richer gravy, as well as guidance on what kind of turkey to buy.

    Crispier Skinned Turkey
    Crispier Skinned Turkey

    For a turkey with skin that's crisp, and flavorful, keep a small saucepan of melted butter, whole peppercorns, sherry vinegar, and dried sage and thyme on the stove, and use a basting brush to slather the infused butter all over the turkey as it roasts, every 30 minutes or so.

    See the recipe for The Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey »







    Fluffier Pumpkin Pie
    Fluffier Pumpkin Pie

    There are those who would say it's just not Thanksgiving without a pumpkin pie - and those who can't abide the pie's dense texture. A simple way to keep all of your guests happy: Fold two whipped egg whites into the filling for an airier, soufflé-like consistency.


    See the recipe for Pumpkin Chiffon Pie »







    Pecan Pie Brittle
    Sweeter, Richer Gravy

    Fortified wines like Sherry, Port, and Madeira contain not only more

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