Blog Posts by Andrew Knowlton, BA Foodist, Bon Appetit Magazine

  • 5 Ways to Eat More (Winter) Veggies: Rutabaga

    Dear BA Foodist,

    I've officially got the winter cooking blues. I'm so sick of cooking potatoes and Brussels sprouts. Any vegetable suggestions to tide me over until asparagus season?

    Sally Degage, Princeton, New Jersey

    Dear Sally,

    Because of ingredient availability, cooking in winter can be more challenging than in spring and summer. Perhaps you are buying the wrong vegetables. There's a whole world of unsung winter vegetables that are increasingly available in supermarkets across America. To inspire you, I've listed my favorite winter vegetables along with recipes from five great chefs. We began with cardoons, celeriac, and Jerusalem artichokes (a.k.a sunchokes)--today is all about rutabagas which taste like turnips (and I mean that as a compliment).

    Rutabaga Gratin
    from Steven Satterfield at Miller Union, Atlanta

    1 large or 2 small rutabagas, peeled and thinly sliced (See note below)
    1 cup chicken broth
    1/4 cup heavy cream
    1/4 cup whole milk
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter,

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  • 5 Ways to Eat More (Winter) Veggies: Jerusalem Artichokes

    Dear BA Foodist,

    I've officially got the winter cooking blues. I'm so sick of cooking potatoes and Brussels sprouts. Any vegetable suggestions to tide me over until asparagus season?

    Sally Degage, Princeton, New Jersey

    Dear Sally,

    Because of ingredient availability, cooking in winter can be more challenging than in spring and summer. Perhaps you are buying the wrong vegetables. There's a whole world of unsung winter vegetables that are increasingly available in supermarkets across America. To inspire you, I've listed my favorite winter vegetables along with recipes from five great chefs. We began with cardoons, yesterday was celeriac, and today is all about Jerusalem artichokes (a.k.a sunchokes), which look like bumpy potatoes. They're great raw or slightly cooked.


    Smashed Jerusalem artichokes with black winter truffle
    from Michael Tusk at Quince, San Francisco

    1 pound Jerusalem artichokes
    1 tablespoon salt
    3 1/2 tablespoons butter
    1/2 ounce shaved black winter truffle (or 1/2

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  • 5 Ways to Eat More (Winter) Veggies: Celeriac

    Dear BA Foodist,

    I've officially got the winter cooking blues. I'm so sick of cooking potatoes and brussels sprouts. Any vegetable suggestions to tide me over until asparagus season?

    Sally Degage, Princeton, New Jersey

    Dear Sally,

    Because of ingredient availability, cooking in winter can be more challenging than in spring and summer. Perhaps you are buying the wrong vegetables. There's a whole world of unsung winter vegetables that are increasingly available in supermarkets across America. To inspire you, I've listed my favorite winter vegetables along with recipes from five great chefs. Cardoons led the way yesterday; today it's celeriac (also called celery root), delicious raw or cooked and way more interesting than celery.

    Celery Root Skordalia
    from Ana Sortun at Sofra Bakery and Cafe, Cambridge, MA

    Makes 4 cups

    1 large or 2 small each celery root (small would be like a softball)
    2 large baking potatoes
    3/4 cup whole blanched almonds
    3 large cloves of garlic, roughly

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  • 5 Ways to Eat More (Winter) Veggies: Cardoons

    Dear BA Foodist,

    I've officially got the winter cooking blues. I'm so sick of cooking potatoes and brussels sprouts. Any vegetable suggestions to tide me over until asparagus season?

    Sally Degage, Princeton, New Jersey


    Dear Sally,

    Because of ingredient availability, cooking in winter can be more challenging than in spring and summer. Perhaps you are buying the wrong vegetables. There's a whole world of unsung winter vegetables that are increasingly available in supermarkets across America. To inspire you, I've listed my favorite winter vegetables along with recipes from five great chefs. First up, cardoons--think of them as Italian celery with a mild artichoke-like flavor.

    Cardoons alla Romana
    from Marco Wiles at Vinoteca Poscol, Houston

    Serves 4

    1 pound tender white cardoons (cleaned and cut into 2" pieces)
    1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
    2 garlic cloves, sliced thin
    1/2 cup water
    1/2 cup loose packed fresh mint (chopped)
    pinch of dried crushed red pepper

    1) Place cardoons

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  • Why You Shouldn't Eat Out on Valentine's Day

    Valentine's Day (aka Black Sunday) is just three days away, and if you haven't made a restaurant reservation yet, well, it's time to think about cooking at home (or perhaps visiting a White Castle near you). But don't feel left out, I won't be dining out either...by choice, mind you. So even if you have secured a two-top at some romantic spot, I'll still try talk you out of it. Not because I have a disdain for self-proclaimed romantic restaurants or because I take issue with "love." No, I have five other reasons why you should never go out for a Valentine's Day dinner.

    1. Amateur night Like New Year's Eve, Valentine's Day attracts restaurant novices--those people that complain too much about their wait or their table or their undercooked steak. Too many rookies at any one restaurant can disrupt the flow and feel of a place. It's the same reason I avoid hotspots on the weekend. The chances of mediocre meal are greatly increased.

    2. Inflation "Free glass of champagne with your dinner"

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  • Best Restaurant Name of the Year 2010

    The front-runner for this year's best (or is that worst?) restaurant name is Phoenix's The Notorious P.I.G. A visit to their website reveals more curious decisions: a Stevie Ray Vaughan tune instead of something from the Biggie Smalls's catalog? C'mon, at least go whole hog. Oh well, apparently the b.a.r.b.e.c.u.e. is pretty good.

    ***Note: Last year's winner for best (or, rather, worst) restaurant name, Slope's Bistro Restaurant Bar and Grill in Brooklyn, has closed. The owners misidentified the neighborhood's needs; they were looking for a cafe.

    Related:


    More from the BA Foodist:
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  • The BA Foodist's Laws for Making Nachos

    I still haven't decided whom I'll be pulling for this weekend. No one deserves a Super Bowl winning team more than New Orleans, but as a lifelong Atlanta Falcons fan, it's tough to root for a division rival. Indianapolis, on the other hand, is a bit vanilla--they get the job done and have the best QB in the league--but they just don't get me excited.

    One thing I'm sure about is what I'll be eating. Real Super Bowl parties don't have silly food themes based on which teams are playing. (Apparently that's what a few of my colleagues are planning to do.) Resist. I'll be making what I always make: nachos. Any significant moment in my life has been marked with a big plate of nachos. After every little league baseball game victory, my folks took me to a place called The Derby for a heaping mound of nachos. After I finished my college thesis, I rewarded myself with a few pitchers of Labatts (hey, it was cheap) and an order of Cactus League Nachos from Gipper's Sports Grill in Lewiston, Maine.

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  • Is Water Better Than Canned Chicken Stock?

    Michael Ruhlman--cookbook author, blogger, and Cleveland cheerleader extraordinaire--once made me promise I'd never, under any circumstances, use canned or boxed chicken stock again. He claimed water was just as good a substitute, if not better. Why? He blogged all about it here. Basically, he thinks canned stocks taste like creek water. Have you ever tasted canned chicken stock straight? I have and let's just say that Ruhlman makes a very good point.

    I'm pretty good about making my own chicken stock and having a few pints of it in the fridge at any given time. Still, as my colleague Amy Albert points out below, there's often no time to make the homemade stuff. In its place, Albert recommends five alternatives...none of them water. Over the next several weeks I plan to give each a try. I wonder what Ruhlman would say?
    --Andrew Knowlton


    Good chicken broth is the foundation of many great dishes, but sometimes there's no time to make homemade. When cooking soups, risottos, and stews

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  • Top 10 Best New Romantic Getaways for Foodies

    Liven up your winter with a quick trip to these spots that have stellar food, a warm welcome, and a certain off-the-beaten-path appeal.

    Cabane à Sucre au Pied de Cochon


    Saint-Benoît de Mirabel, Québec

    29 miles from Montréal

    Martin Picard of Montréal's Au Pied de Cochon celebrates maple syrup season with this "sugar shack" (open March 11 to May) featuring dishes like buckwheat crepes and a smoked-mackerel omelet. 11382 rang de la Fresnière; 450-258-1732; cabaneasucreaupieddecochon.com

    • The Hil
      Palmetto, Georgia
      33 miles from Atlanta
      Located in a sustainable living community, The Hil serves a mean chicken pot pie with a side of okra stew. 9110 Selborne Lane; 770-463-6040; the-hil.com

    • June
      Peoria Heights, Illinois
      155 miles from Chicago
      Alinea alum chef Josh Adams has opened a farm-to-table restaurant with a molecular gastronomy twist. Think roasted eggplant pierogi with carrot curry emulsion. 4450 North

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  • This recipe turned me into a wings believer

    chickenwings_484.jpgchickenwings_484.jpgI dig wings as much as the next person, but I'm not the kind of guy that plans a dinner around a plate of butter-and-hot-sauce-bathed, deep-fried chicken parts. Or at least I didn't think I was until I visited the The Good Fork in Red Hook, Brooklyn back in March 2006, just a few weeks after this mom-and-pop restaurant opened. I had finished the now famous Korean-style Steak and Eggs (you'll find this recipe, which we ran in our September 2007 issue, here) but couldn't stop thinking about my appetizer: Asian-style chicken wings. These plump wings were perfect--crispy skin, juicy meat, and bathed in just the right amount of fiery sriracha and sambal oelek sauce. They were nothing like the scrawny, over-cooked, over-buttery specimens I ate growing up.

    A few days later I returned for dinner with only one thing on my mind--wings. I had a plan. I'd get two orders to start, a pint of Six Point Sweet Action and see where that took me. Perhaps another round of wings or an order of pork

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