Blog Posts by Naseem Sheikh

  • The Benefits of Low Emission Coal Technology-by Naseem Sheikh

    Although we should not promote coal as energy resource as its really very toxic and not environmental friendly but now days Pakistan is in the grip of a serious energy crisis that is affecting all sectors of the economy and the various segments of the society.

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  • Public Attitudes Toward Climate Change Across Countries-by-Naseem Sheikh

    From the World Bank commissioned report in 2009: "Public attitudes toward climate change: findings from a multi-country poll",comes this interesting look at country wide attitudes to climate change.

    is climate change a problem

    So it's interesting to look at how these views affected country attitudes at Durban recently.
    It is pertinent to mention here that Asia has been worst hit by severe climate change. Pakistan is one of the countries that have been severely hit in the recent years by disastrous effects of climate change including flash floods and devastating earthquakes.
    "Developed nations are not guilty of causing the climate change that developing nations claim they are suffering," said Tom Harris, executive director of ICSC which is headquartered in Ottawa, Canada. "Climate changes all the time-both warming and cooling-due to natural causes and there is nothing that we can do to stop it. However, to the degree possible, and considering our economic circumstances, developed nations still have a moral

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  • Lack of Government Will, Useless Climate Debate and Loss of Biodiversity-by Naseem Sheikh

    The United Nations has launched the Decade on Biodiversity with Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urging humanity to live in harmony with nature and to preserve and properly manage its riches for the prosperity of current and future generations.

    decade of biodiversity It is now widely recognized that climate change and biodiversity are interconnected. Biodiversity is affected by climate change, with negative consequences for human well-being, but biodiversity, through the ecosystem services it supports, also makes an important contribution to both climate-change mitigation and adaptation.
    After extended negotiations in Durban , the 194 parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) agreed on a package of decisions, known as the Durban Platform, which include the launch of a protocol or legal instrument that would apply to all members, a second commitment period for the existing Kyoto Protocol and the launch of the Green Climate Fund.
    decade of biodiversity
    The 194 countries negotiating here also agreed that such

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  • Can Synthetic Trees Be a Substitute for Real Ones in CO2 Absorption ?

    The Earth's temperature is rising. We can argue about whether it is a short-term or long-term trend, or whether it is natural variation or man-induced, but it is warming. But now it's our duty to pay something to cure our mother earth. A normal person helps it by just planting a tree because trees absorb Co2.
    But is there something we can do to absorb CO2 beyond trees.
    The idea of forming synthetic tress has been worked on for some time by by Dr Klaus Lackner, of Columbia University.it is hoped that these "synthetic trees" will be able to collect and trap carbon about 1000 times faster than the real thing.
    synthetic trees Basically as the wind blows though plastic "leaves," the carbon is trapped in a chamber,compressed and stored as liquid carbon dioxide.
    The technology is similar to that used to capture carbon from flue stacks at coal-fired power plants, but the difference is that the "synthetic tree" can catch carbon at any place and at any time . As Professor Klaus Lackner, Ewing-Worzel

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  • The United Nations today launched the Decade on Biodiversity with Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urging humanity to live in harmony with nature and to preserve and properly manage its riches for the prosperity of current and future generations.
    It is now widely recognised that climate change and biodiversity are interconnected. Biodiversity is affected by climate change, with negative consequences for human well-being, but biodiversity, through the ecosystem services it supports, also makes an important contribution to both climate-change mitigation and adaptation. After extended negotiations over the weekend, the 194 parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) agreed on a package of decisions, known as the Durban Platform, which include the launch of a protocol or legal instrument that would apply to all members, a second commitment period for the existing Kyoto Protocol and the launch of the Green Climate Fund.
    The 194 countries negotiating here also agreed

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  • Role of Forests in Climate Change –by Naseem Sheikh

    The humanitarian emergency caused by few last months' devastating floods in Asia warning that the situation could get worse, The people affected by this crisis have lost everything, and their difficulties are only just beginning two countries Pakistan and Thailand badly hit by the disaster. Hundreds of thousands of people face a struggle for survival over the next six months. Thousands of homes have been damaged, possessions destroyed and hundreds of schools, roads and health facilities are closed.

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts that by the year 2050 around 60 percent of the world's population will experience severe water shortages, with 33 percent thought to be already under water stress. Water cycle has been disturbed badly in all over the world causing, food depletion, drought, flooding, rising sea level, increase in green house gases and scary food shortage. The root causes behind the scene consider deforestations mainly.

    Forests cover

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  • The environment is the most precious asset we possess, greater than any economy or business. Without it, the world as we know it could not possibly exist, and as we speak our environment is changing beyond recognition before our very eyes.

    We all heard in our routeings life about carbon level and carbon foot prints but a normal simple Lehman have no much more idea what is carbon level and carbon foot prints, we can say in easy language that carbon is an essential constituent of our life and very important for making glucose in our blood as much we eat or drink it accumulate in the body in the form of carbon as by doing different types of exercises, yoga and dieting we maintain our body weight to ovoid it to store excessive amount of carbon which further seems easily in the form of overweight and obesity. Which is a root cause of different types of diseases, similarly in our environment carbon is present in specific amount mainly in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon

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  • Coal is Particularly Nasty-by Naseem Sheikh


    About three-quarters of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during the past 20 years have been due to fossil-fuel burning. Activities consuming fossil fuels include power generation, industrial/manufacturing processes, transport. The rest of carbon dioxide emissions are predominantly due to land-use change, especially deforestation.

    The main drawback of fossil fuels is pollution. Burning any fossil fuel mainly produces carbon dioxide, which contributes to the "greenhouse effect", warming the Earth. It produces more carbon dioxide than burning oil or gas. It also produces sulphur dioxide, a gas that contributes to acid rain. We can reduce this before releasing the waste gases into the atmosphere. It is a leading cause of smog, global warming, and air toxics.

    Coal is particularly nasty. The attraction to coal is powerful and obvious because the Pakistan, being one of the largest coals (lignite) deposits in the world consisting of 184,123 billion

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  • Bio Fuel an Energy Resource Idea for Pakistan in Recent Energy Calamity- by Naseem Sheikh

    Pakistan is spending almost 20 per cent of its foreign exchange on fossil fuels imports. Annually $7 billion is being eaten away in import of conventional energy resources that is equivalent to 40 per cent of total imports by the country, but the country still lacks far behind in tapping the vast potential of alternate energy resources.

    A silhouette of Pakistan primary energy resources shows Pakistan is highly depending on conservative sources of energy. Its share in energy supply mix is highly dependent on oil, liquid petroleum and natural gas. The primary commercial energy supplies during 2007-2008 were 62.9 million tonnes of oil equivalent (mtoe). The share of natural gas in primary energy supplies during 2007-2008 was 47.5% followed by oil 30.5%, hydro electricity 10.9%, coal 9.2%, nuclear electricity 12%, LPG 0.7%, and imported electricity 0.1%.


    It is of high concerning that NEPRA has increased power tariff by 94.9 percent for domestic, 67.6 percent for commercial

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  • Coping with Climate Change-by Naseem Sheikh


    Natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, droughts, and volcanic eruptions are found more and more in the news these days. Every year they are responsible for many deaths and serious injuries and they destroy livelihoods and damage economies. Scientists predict that climate change will affect the frequency and severity of some natural disasters like hurricanes, typhoons, and flooding.

    Earthquakes do occur at the boundaries between tectonic plates because of plate motions. Understanding why plates change direction and speed is key to unlocking huge seismic events such as the famous Japan earthquake, which shifted the Earth's axis by several inches, or February's New Zealand quake. Scientists have for the first time shown a link between intensifying climate events and tectonic plate movement in findings that could provide a valuable insight into why huge tremors occur. Tectonic movements influence climate by creating new mountains and sea trenches and vice versa also.

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Pagination

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