CLOSER TO FINE: Lilith Fair Fashions from the 90's

Photo by: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
ELECTRO-COWGIRL-
That was Beth Orton's M.O. in '98. The techno-folk singer reflected her fusion in her fashion choices, as if you couldn't tell. Here's how I ... more 
Photo by: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
ELECTRO-COWGIRL-
That was Beth Orton's M.O. in '98. The techno-folk singer reflected her fusion in her fashion choices, as if you couldn't tell. Here's how I imagine the hat decision played out. STYLIST: Hey Beth, want to wear this hat Willie Nelson left behind backstage? BETH: Hmm. What color is it? STYLIST: Hat colored. BETH: Why don't you dip it in this concoction of Skittles, MDMA and Red Dye. STYLIST: Which one? BETH: The one marked "Y2K". STYLIST: Oh great idea. That will add just the kick this hat needs. less 
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Thu, Oct 6, 2011 4:31 PM EDT


In 1996, Starbucks was a coffee shop with open mic nights, Putumayo was a resource for both dresses and mix tapes, Jennifer Love Hewitt and Neve Campbell vied for the title of teen movie crush, and young girls across the country mourned the cancellation of their favorite show, The Jordan Catalano Eyes Kiss Heart-Pounding Sigh show, or "My So-Called Life".



It was the perfect moment to launch Lilith Fair, an all woman music festival designed to prove that a line-up of female singers could compete with Lollapalooza and generate millions. And it did.



After an 11 year hiatus, organizer and singer of sad, sad songs, Sarah McLachlan, has re-launched Lilith Fair in the U.S. this month with an all-star line-up. Many of the original performers are still on the bill, but the fashions--over-sized hats, shapeless dresses, crop tops--have been retired. Or have they?