Sparse Brows: Would You Consider An Eyebrow Transplant?

IStockPhotoIStockPhotoLike most people, I have a list of physical traits I really don't like about myself. I hesitate to use the word "hate," because that sounds so...I don't know - junior high, I guess, so I'll just say that I really don't like my receding chin, crooked fingers, thick hips and thin eyebrows (among other things). And while I can pretty much blame genetics for most of these shameful traits, I have only myself to blame for the state of my eyebrows. Back in college, they were much fuller, but then I started tweezing them with gusto (hey, it was the '90s!). More recently I started having them threaded on a regular basis and now they're thin, sparse lines that don't even trail to the corner of my eyes, but stop about halfway to where they should go. Still, I stop short (pun intended) at the idea of getting an eyebrow transplant. Yes, you read that right-an eyebrow transplant!

The pricey (about $5,400) - and one would assume, painful - technique is one of the latest in a long list of beauty-enhancing procedures now available for those longing to turn back the clock or perfect what nature gave them. The Daily Mail reports that in recent years hair transplants have become far more sophisticated than the early days of plug-grafts, with one follicle transplanted at a time now, making it possible to replicate the natural angle of the eyebrow.

"During the latest procedures, a very thin strip of skin (6-7 cm long, and 4-5mm wide) is taken from the area of the scalp where the hair is softest. The surgeon then removes each hair from the piece of skin with a thin needle. Next, he makes up to 50 tiny incisions with a scalpel where the eyebrow should be, and, using a needle, inserts each hair follicle into the incisions. The results are not immediate: it takes two to three months for the new hair to grow through the skin, and up to six months for a well-defined eyebrow. The new brows need trimming about once a month as the hair continues to grow as it would on your head."

Ugh, no thanks. I think I'll stick to my brow pencil on special occasions and leave the transplant surgeries to those who are really insecure. Or just like pain (and have money to burn!).

By Wendy Atterberry for The Frisky

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