Raw or cooked: Turns out there's no wrong way to eat your veggies

Quick, who do you believe: the raw-food enthusiast who says cooking vegetables saps them of vital nutrients? Or researchers across the country who've found that roasted tomatoes are higher in cancer-fighting lycopene? The happy truth: Both are right. When you cook produce, it loses some nutrients, but the heat-induced changes make other vegetables easier to digest, according to food scientist Luke Howard of the University of Arkansas. Raw or lightly cooked, there's no wrong way to eat your veggies. Here's the win-win, with recipes to try.

CORN
EAT IT RAW...

Great for B-complex vitamins, which ramp up energy and sharpen your mind.
Try it in Summer Corn and Tomato Pasta »



EAT IT COOKED...

Provides a special vitamin-A precursor, which helps ward off lung cancer.
Try it in Fiesta Pork with Corn and Cheesy Polenta »




TOMATO

EAT IT RAW...

Great for vitamin C, which strengthens the immune system, and potassium, which improves nerve and muscle function.
Try it in No-Cook Vegetable Lasagna »


EAT IT COOKED...

Provides higher amounts of lycopene, which guards against UV damage, cancer and heart attacks.
Try it in Chicken Ragu »



BROCCOLI

EAT IT RAW...

Like tomato, it's also great for vitamin C to enhances the immune system, and folate, which boosts mood.
Try it in Antipasti Bowl »


EAT IT COOKED...

Like corn, it also provides certain vitamin-A precursors, which give you dewy, youthful skin and hair.
Try it in Orange Beef and Broccoli »



SPINACH
EAT IT RAW...

Great for folate, manganese and magnesium, which fight stress and depression.
Try it in Spinach Salad with Grilled Ham and Peaches »



EAT IT COOKED...

Provides antioxidants like lutein and zeaxanthin, which protect eyesight as the years roll by.
Try it in Artichoke, Tomato and Spinach Pizza »



CARROTS
EAT IT RAW...

Great for vitamin K, which builds healthier bones and, very important, makes blood clot properly.
Try it in No-Fry Shrimp Spring Rolls »


EAT IT COOKED...

Provides increased beta-carotene, which keeps your eyes healthy and helps you fight off infections.
Try it in Carrot-Ginger Soup »


By Christine Richmond

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