New Yorkers Shocked to Find They're Subjects of Neighbor's Photo Exhibit

Photo by: Julia Saul Gallery
Arne Svenson, The Neighbors #1, 2012, pigment print, 63 x 26", ed. 5
The exhibit is called "The Neighbors," and Svenson was careful not to reveal the identities of his ... more 
Photo by: Julia Saul Gallery
Arne Svenson, The Neighbors #1, 2012, pigment print, 63 x 26", ed. 5
The exhibit is called "The Neighbors," and Svenson was careful not to reveal the identities of his subjects. "The strength of the imagery lies in fact that we can see ourselves in the anonymous figures of 'The Neighbors,'" a representative for the Julia Saul Gallery explained.
less 
1 / 8
Fri, May 17, 2013 4:06 PM EDT
New York photographer Arne Svenson found inspiration for his latest work right outside his windows. "The neighbors don't know they are being photographed," he explained in an essay that goes with the exhibit, currently on display at the Julie Saul Gallery in Chelsea. "I carefully shoot from the shadows of my home into theirs." But the subjects of his photos, who live in a luxury apartment across the street from Svenson, were furious to find out that they had been photographed in their own homes without their knowledge. "A grown man should not be able to photograph kids in their rooms with a telephoto lens," Clifford Finn told the New York Post. "You can argue artistic license all you want, but that's really the issue here. I'm sorry, but I'm really bothered by this." The artist disagrees. "They are performing behind a transparent scrim on a stage of their own creation with the curtain raised high," Svenson said in a statement. Take a look for yourself and weigh in: Are these images artistic, or invasive? -- By Lylah M. Alphonse, Senior Editor, Yahoo! Shine