6 chemically explosive on-screen/off-screen couples

Andrew McCarthy and Molly Ringwald-
For non-believers in the power of on-screen sparks consider "Pretty in Pink". The two stars weren't a technical couple but director John Hughes, a brilliant chemist ... more 
Andrew McCarthy and Molly Ringwald-
For non-believers in the power of on-screen sparks consider "Pretty in Pink". The two stars weren't a technical couple but director John Hughes, a brilliant chemist if ever there was one, told both Ringwald and McCarthy the other had a crush on them. It's hard to over-turn Brat Pack egos, but the challenge of physical domination was the key to the kiss at the end of the movie that left Duckie to nurse his pompadour with turtle wax tragically. less 
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Thu, Oct 6, 2011 2:39 PM EDT


George Clooney and a handgun had more chemistry with movie-goers than Drew Barrymore and Justin Long. "The American" owned the box office this holiday weekend, while "Going the Distance" floundered with viewers. But not with critics. Despite the lame trailer (see above for hiiiiilarious caught in the act sex scenes, funny sidekicks with quips) movie reviewers across the board were surprised at how much chemistry the real life couple has on screen. Turns out a mediocre script can be salvaged by good, old-fashioned attraction.



Reviewers from Entertainment Weekly, MTV, and the Washington Post prattle on about Long and Barrymore: "One cute couple". "Just the right sort of chemistry." And "it's clear they have chemistry."



In other words, their water-gun sprays of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are so strong they dose people in a movie theater just watching them. On the flipside, bad on-screen chemistry has the reverse effect. It dehydrates movie-goer loins. See "Gigli". "The Break-up". "Days of Thunder". These are the kinds of movies that prove two people may be great friends, but they shouldn't be having sex and certainly not getting paid for it. Or maybe I'm being too harsh. Maybe most couples would come off as stimulant-free on screen. After all, celebrities are only human. Except the few that aren't. Consider 6 examples of on-screen chemistry that should be submitted for review to the explosives division of the CIA.