Boston Bombing Suspects' Family: What they're saying

Suspects Tamerlan Tsarnaev and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (AP/FBI)
As the hunt for the surviving suspect of the Boston Marathon bombings, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, and the motive behind the horrific act intensifies, law enforcement and the media are zeroing on the alleged bombers' family for clues.

"They never could have done this. Never, ever, ever!" The suspect's father Anzort Tsarnaev told People Magazine when they reached him in Russia by phone on Friday morning. Referring to the death of his son, Tamerlan, he said, "I feel terrible! Why they kill my son? Something wrong! My sons never do bombing. They hated gun-how they do bombs?" He added that he had spoken with the young men the day before about the bombings and that they "hate terrorists."

So far, there has been no word from the suspects' mother who is reported to be Zubeidat K. Tsarnaeva, a 45-year-old sharing the same address a the brothers. Natick Patch reports that she was arrested in June 2012 for shoplifting over $1600 worth of clothing from Lord and Taylor department store. Authorities haven't officially confirmed her relationship to the brothers.

Alina Tsarneava, a New York woman who identified the suspects to a reporter as her "brothers," also expressed disbelief. When questioned  through the door of her apartment early this morning, she remembered Dzhokhar as "an amazing child." She also said that "They were great people. I never would have expected it. They are smart - I don't know what's gotten into them." She added that "I'm hurt for everyone who has been hurt. I'm sorry for all the people who are hurt and for all the people who lost their lives."

CBS news tracked down two uncles, Alvi and Ruslan Tsarni, who live in the Washington D.C. area, and both reacted with shock. Ruslan Tsarni said he hadn't seen either suspect in about six years and that they had moved to Boston in 2000. He remembered Dzhokhar as a "nice boy." Referring to Tamerlan, he said, "I would call him a loser." He added that after learning of their involvement in the bombings he felt they were, "barbarians, wherever they are….They do not deserve to be on this earth ...What can I say? They murdered." He also said that Dzhokhar should turn himself in, "and ask for forgiveness from the victims. He put a shame on our family… he put a shame on the entire Chechen ethnicity…." It's reported that the suspects emigrated to the United States from Russia seeking refuge from the war in Chechnya.

A second uncle, Alvi Tsarni reacted with disbelief. "I can't believe this, it's not possible," he said, "My nephews can't do this stuff. There's no way." He expressed that he was devastated at seeing pictures of the men who he acknowledged resembled his nephews as he remembered them.