Food Expiration Dates 101: How Long to Keep Dairy and Eggs

Food Expiration Dates 101: How Long to Keep Dairy and EggsFood Expiration Dates 101: How Long to Keep Dairy and EggsBy: Lisa Cericola

Who hasn't sniffed the milk carton and hoped for the best? It's tough to know when butter, cheese, cream, milk, yogurt and eggs have gone bad so we've created this handy cheat sheet of expiration dates from StillTasty.com. Read on to find out when to toss eggs and dairy products!

1. Milk
Unopened or opened: One week after sell-by date in the refrigerator or three months in the freezer. Milk that has been continuously refrigerated will usually remain safe to consume for one week past the sell-by date. Freeze in an airtight container, leaving a half-inch of space at the top because milk will expand when frozen. If it develops an off color, odor or appearance, discard it. Milk is best stored in in the main body of the refrigerator, which is usually colder than the refrigerator door.

2. Butter
Unopened or opened:
One month after sell-by date on package in the refrigerator or six to nine months in the freezer. Butter may be left at room temperature for one to two days, but it will begin to spoil quickly after that if not refrigerated. Salted butter will generally freeze better than unsalted butter. If it develops an off color, odor or appearance, discard it.

3. Yogurt
Unopened or opened:
Seven to 10 days after sell-by date in the refrigerator or one to two months in the freezer.Yogurt that has been continuously refrigerated will usually remain safe to consume for seven to 10 days past the sell-by date. If mold appears, discard the entire package.

4. Buttermilk
Unopened or opened:
Two weeks in the refrigerator or three months in the freezer. Who hasn't had leftover buttermilk on their hands? For best results, freeze any leftovers in an airtight container.

5. Eggs (Raw, In the Shell)
Three to five weeks in the refrigerator or one year in the freezer.Yes, you can freeze raw eggs! Simply crack them into an airtight container (or freezer bag) and add a half teaspoon of salt for every one cup of raw egg. For desserts, use one tablespoon of sugar per cup of raw egg. For regular use, eggs are best stored in their original cartons in the main body of the refrigerator, which is usually colder than the egg rack on your refrigerator door.

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