Gobble it Up: 7 Superfoods to Include in Your Thanksgiving Meal

Photo by: Family Kitchen
Cranberries
All berries are low in calories, rich in fiber and antioxidants - but tangy cranberries are particularly high in vitamin C.
Make cranberry sauce spiked with citrus
... more 
Photo by: Family Kitchen
Cranberries
All berries are low in calories, rich in fiber and antioxidants - but tangy cranberries are particularly high in vitamin C.
Make cranberry sauce spiked with citrus
Ingredients:
1 (12-ounce) bag cranberries (fresh or frozen)
1 - 1 1/2 cups sugar (white or brown)
1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and chopped
zest and juice of an orange
zest and juice of a lemon
1/2-1 cup raisins or chopped dried apricots
1/2-1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans (I like to toast mine first)
Directions:
Cook the cranberries, sugar, and 1 cup of water in a saucepan over low heat for about 5 minutes, or until the skins pop open. Add the apple, zests, and juices and cook for 15 more minutes, until the berries burst and the mixture thickens. Remove from the heat and add the raisins and nuts. Let cool, and serve chilled. less 
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Mon, Nov 19, 2012 12:58 PM EST
Although Thanksgiving is known as one of the biggest eating days of the year, the most popular items on a typical holiday dinner table are generally not unhealthy -- in fact, some of the most nutrient-dense whole foods commonly make it onto Thanksgiving dinner menus. It makes sense that during the harvest season -- the essence of Thanksgiving celebrations -- plenty of fresh produce would be included in the big feast. From roast turkey to Brussels sprouts -- here are some of the very best things you can eat this Thanksgiving. - By Julie Van Rosendaal



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