10 Ways Your Job Is Killing You

Photo by: Joe Raedle | Getty Images
Commuting-
According to the Gallup organization, the average commute from home to work is 23 minutes, but workers with longer commutes reported a larger range of ... more 
Photo by: Joe Raedle | Getty Images
Commuting-
According to the Gallup organization, the average commute from home to work is 23 minutes, but workers with longer commutes reported a larger range of negative physical and emotional conditions. Predictably, these health issues worsened as the length of the commute increased. The study found that 19 percent of respondents traveled more than 30 minutes to get to work, while 3 percent reported commutes of more than an hour. Those with longer commutes were more likely to report neck and back pain, high cholesterol, and obesity. Among those with commutes of more than 90 minutes, 40 percent spent most of the day worrying. The anxiety interfered with their ability to feel well-rested and experience enjoyment during their waking hours. The study found that the greater an employee's commute, the more likely it was that productivity would be compromised. less 
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Tue, Nov 8, 2011 6:44 PM EST
By Daniel Bukszpan, CNBC.com

Employees who call in sick normally get most of the blame for lost productivity, but a phenomenon known as "presenteeism" has been gaining notice, as well. Defined as the act of coming in to work when you're sick and doing a third-rate job as a result, presenteeism costs businesses billions of dollars a year in lost productivity.

If presenteeism is damaging to businesses, then it would stand to reason that the workplace would be better off if sick workers stayed home until they got better. When the illness is a byproduct of the workplace itself, however, that worker will just get sick again and keep doing a listless and unproductive job.

Whether environmental or psychological, many workplaces have conditions that can make employees sick. These factors have a domino effect that ultimately is as bad for the business as it is for the employee.

What are 10 ways that your work may be killing you and your employer? Click ahead and find out.

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